Seminar: cryopreservation – Law and Ethics at the Frontiers of Medicine and Science

12 June 2017

Date: Wednesday 28 June 2017

Time: 18:30 – 20:00

Registration from 18:15

20:00 onwards drinks reception

Venue: Doughty Street Chambers, 53-54 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LS

Doughty Street Chambers is delighted to invite you to a seminar on Wednesday 28 June on Law and Ethics at the Frontiers of Medicine and Science.

In the recent cryopreservation case In re JS (A Child) [2017] 4 WLR 1, the High Court considered the wishes of a terminally ill 14 year old child that her body be cryopreserved upon her death.  The case focused attention on medical and scientific advances not covered or contemplated by existing laws, such as the Human Tissue Act 2004.  How should courts, regulatory bodies, policy makers and lawyers respond?

Doughty Street Chambers convenes a panel of speakers – including lawyers who acted in the JS case and the Director of Regulation at the Human Tissue Authority – to discuss whether the current legal and regulatory framework is keeping up with developments in medicine and science in the 21st century.

The talks will be followed by drinks and networking.

If you would like to secure a place please click here.

 

Chair
Aswini Weereratne QC, Doughty Street Chambers

Speakers

Sarah Bedwell, Director of Regulation, Human Tissue Authority

Zoë Fleetwood, Dawson Cornwell

Christina Helden, Hempsons

Kate Beattie, Doughty Street Chambers

 

 


Job: Research Fellow at University of Edinburgh – Centre for Medical Informatics

5 June 2017

Salary: £32,004 to £38,183
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract
Placed on: 1st June 2017
Closes: 3rd July 2017
Job Ref: 040078

We are seeking a dynamic research fellow to undertake research activities on the Wellcome Trust Seed Award “Patienthood and Participation in the Digital Era”. Responsibilities will include design, data collection, analysis, and publication; assisting with the development and implementation of a programme of public engagement in conjunction with the research; and contributing to new research initiatives arising from the Award, including the development of grant applications for related projects.

Applicants must have a PhD (or near completion) in bioethics or related social science / humanities discipline (or relevant equivalent experience). Excellent project management and organisational skills with the ability to work independently under appropriate supervision is essential.

The post is full time (35 hours per week), available from July 2017 for 12 months and based in The University of Edinburgh’s Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics.

Please include your CV and a supporting statement with details of how you meet the knowledge, skills and experience required for this post.

Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Sarah Chan at Sarah.Chan [at] ed.ac.uk


Job: Legal/Regulatory Senior Policy Analyst at the PHG Foundation

27 May 2017

Location: Cambridge
Salary: £35,000 to £45,000 p.a. (depending on experience) plus benefits
Full time or part time (min 28 hours p.w.)
Fixed Term – 3 years

Cambridge-based health policy think-tank the PHG Foundation seeks a talented and enthusiastic professional with a legal background who is passionate about seeing biomedical research translated effectively into healthcare. Working as part of a multidisciplinary team, your role will be to provide sound legal and regulatory analysis for the Foundation’s health policy projects.

We are open-minded about background, but you must have a good first degree in law, social science, philosophy or similar subject; an excellent grasp of the legal, regulatory and ethical landscape around healthcare, preferably genetics/genomics; and first class analytical, drafting and communication skills.  A postgraduate qualification in medical law, ethics or similar would be a distinct advantage but, most importantly, you must be able to transfer your academic grounding into actionable policy applications.

You will be an excellent networker and have the personal qualities to work creatively and effectively in a small team of highly-motivated colleagues.

For an informal discussion please contact Alison Hall alison.hall [at] phgfoundation.org Tel: 01223 761900

The deadline for applications is 21st June 2017 (please note – previous applicants need not apply)

Interviews will be held in Cambridge on 10th July 2017


Call for abstracts: European Understandings of Advance Decision-making

26 May 2017

12th September 2017 University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

www.eadm.leeds.ac.uk

Keynote speakers

Professor John Ellershaw (Professor of Palliative Medicine, University of Liverpool)

Professor Rob Heywood (Professor of Medical Law, University of East Anglia).

Background

This interdisciplinary conference marks the culmination of the ESRC research seminar series ‘Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’.

Advance medical decision-making occurs in a range of situations, encompassing decisions relating to end-of-life treatment, typically focussed upon refusals of life-sustaining treatment; advance decisions concerning physical health care unrelated to end of life care, including for example birth plans which typically include positive requests for treatments (e.g. an epidural) as well as refusals of treatment; and ADs relating to psychiatric treatment, where individuals with severe mental illness set out their treatment preferences. In each of these situations an advance decision can act as an important mechanism for conveying precedent autonomy, bridging the occurrence of incapacity and providing a clear statement of how the patient wants to be treated, or more usually what treatment the patient does not wish to be given.  Anticipatory decision-making offers great promise and could make a substantial contribution to the empowerment of those lacking capacity, but there are important asymmetries between anticipatory and contemporaneous decision-making that could potentially undermine both the legal and moral authority of an advance decision. The Council of Europe’s Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997) requires that account is taken of a patient’s previously expressed wishes (Article 9), demanding at least a minimal consideration of precedent autonomy. A number of European jurisdictions have gone further, seeking to clarify the standing of advance decisions and to promote legal certainty by providing statutory recognition of the importance and binding nature of at least some advance decisions.

The conference will consider European legislative responses to anticipatory decision-making, seeking to explore those responses within the practical contexts within which advance decision-making occurs.  We are particularly interested in linking legal discourse with policy and practice discourses and the (dis)connect between law, practice and professional guidance.

The conference is generously funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC).

 

Organisation 

This conference is part of the research seminar series’ Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’ funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.  It is being organised by the grant holders, Dr Samantha Halliday, Prof. Jörg Richter and Prof Gillian Hundt.

 

Submissions

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to S.Halliday[at]leeds.ac.uk by 15th June 2017.  Applicants should expect to hear from the convenors by 20th June 2017.

 

Registration

Registration for the conference is free, but compulsory. Numbers are limited and early registration is highly recommended. Please register via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/understandings-of-advance-decision-making-an-interdisciplinary-conference-tickets-33922111950. Bursaries will be available to fund travel and accommodation costs for PhD students – please email S.Halliday[at]leeds.ac.uk if you wish to apply for financial support.  The conference is aimed at both academic and professional attendees and will be CPD accredited.


Job: Research Officer at the Nuffield Council on Bioethics

22 May 2017

Salary: £32,000 to £35,000 per annum
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract; 12 month Maternity Cover

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics examines the ethical issues raised by advances in biology and medicine. It has achieved an international reputation for stimulating public debate in bioethics and advising policy-makers.

The Research Officer will have an important role in helping to deliver the core project work carried out by the Council. They will support the Director and Assistant Directors by organising meetings, carrying out relevant research, providing and revising drafting for papers and reports, overseeing public consultations and surveys, managing the production of publications, overseeing the management of information resources, and assisting with dissemination activities. This is a hugely varied and interesting role which will enable the Research Officer to gain experience of a wide range of research, writing and project-based activities. For example, in the past, research tasks have involved literature reviews, one-to-one interviews and survey response analysis, and writing tasks have included developing background papers on future work topics and drafting blog posts. The Research Officer will have the opportunity to attend external meetings and conferences, and will work closely with the academics, clinicians and other experts who sit on the Council’s committees.

The candidate will require a relevant degree (for example biological sciences, medicine, philosophy, law or social science) and knowledge of bioethical issues. Experience of research and drafting, and familiarity with a range of research techniques and resources, are essential.

This is an excellent opportunity for someone interested in the high-profile area of bioethics to work closely in the development of policy advice.

For further information, please download the application pack. To apply, please complete the application form within this pack and send to recruitment [a] nuffieldfoundation.org.

The closing date for applications is 5pm 2 June. Interviews will be held on 14 June.

If you have any queries about the position please contact Carol Perkins, either on 020 7681 9619 or by email cperkins [at] nuffieldbioethics.org


Workshop: Sex selection – Changes in Australian policy

22 May 2017

9 June, 2017, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Macquarie University Research Centre for Agency, Values, and Ethics (CAVE) and Sydney University Centre for Values, Ethics, and Law in Medicine (VELiM) are hosting a workshop on the latest policy about sex selection in Australia on 9 June. All are welcome to attend but please register for catering purposes.

Speakers:

*   Dr Tereza Hendl (University of Sydney, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine)
*   Prof Wendy Rogers (Macquarie University, Department of Philosophy)
*   Dr Sascha Callaghan (University of Sydney, Sydney Law School)
*   Dr Kate Gleeson (Macquarie University, Macquarie Law School)
*   Morgan Carpenter (Organisation Intersex International Australia)
*   Dr Tamara Browne (Deakin University, School of Medicine)

Preliminary Program:

10:00 – 10:10: Tereza Hendl and Wendy Rogers, Opening Remarks

10:10 – 10:30: Wendy Rogers, “What’s changed on sex selection since 2007 Guidelines”

10:30 – 11:15: Sascha Callaghan, “Sex selection and the law”

11:15 – 11:45: Morning tea

11:45 – 12:30: Tereza Hendl, “2017 Guidelines, sex selection and gender equity”

12:30 – 13:15: Kate Gleeson, “Sex selection using IVF and abortion from feminist legal perspectives”

13:15 – 14:00: Lunch

14:00 – 14:45: Morgan Carpenter, “Prenatal genetic diagnosis and its implications for children with intersex variations”

14:45 – 15:00: Tamara Browne, “Is gender disappointment a mental disorder?”

16:00 – 16:30: Panel discussion

Contact: All are welcome but please register with Tereza Hendl tereza.hendl[at]sydney.edu.au

For information about other events, please visit: mq.edu.au/cave/events


Workshop: Does Dignity Help in Thinking about Paternalism?’

15 May 2017

Monday 29th May 2017, Edinburgh.

Every year during the Spring term the Edinburgh Legal Theory Research Group holds the Legal Theory Spring Festival (also known as Spring Workshops), which is composed by a series of thematic workshops organised by staff and students of the University of Edinburgh.

The 2017 Legal Theory Festival is scheduled for May 29th-June 1st, 2017. The festival is open to all and attendance is free – but places are limited and registration is required.

Full details about the Festival can be found here.

The workshops include the following:

Monday 29th May 2017:  Barbara Levenbook (NCSU) – ‘Does Dignity Help in Thinking about Paternalism?’
Venue: Old College, Elder Room 3:30pm – 5:30pm

Register via Eventbrite here.