Job: Post-doctoral research fellow in the Laws of Social Reproduction at KCL

18 December 2018

Research Associate, Laws of Social Reproduction

King’s College London – The Dickson Poon School of Law

Location: London
Salary: £37,412
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract
Placed On: 11th December 2018
Closes: 13th January 2019
Job Ref: R6/FFL/2517/18-RN
 The salary will be paid at Grade 6, £37,412 per annum, inclusive of £3,223 per annum London Allowance.

This is an exciting opportunity to work on a large-scale European Research Council funded project titled ‘Laws of Social Reproduction’. The project undertakes a comparison of the law’s regulation of five sectors of women’s labour including sex work, erotic dancing, commercial surrogacy, paid domestic work and unpaid domestic work.

The post-doctoral research associate (PDRA)’s main responsibilities are to conduct literature review across relevant disciplines, conduct qualitative research in India, analyse the field work data using suitable software, organise a major national level workshop involving numerous stakeholders including academics, activists and policy-makers, publish academic outputs and disseminate the research findings of the project.

Prior field work experience in India essential; field work experience in at least one of the five sectors of reproductive labour listed above is highly desirable. Proven research skills essential. Applications from doctoral and post-doctoral candidates in law, anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, medical ethics and feminist economics are welcome.

The selection process will include a panel interview and a presentation.

For an informal discussion to find out more about the role please contact: Professor Prabha Kotiswaran, Prabha.kotiswaran [AT] kcl.ac.uk

To apply, please register with the King’s College London application portal and complete your application online. When applying, in the ‘Upload supporting documents’ section, please attach a personal statement to tell us why you are suitable for the role.

Please enclose writing sample relevant to the themes of the research project.

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Radio: The Changing Face of Procreation

26 September 2018

BBC World Service, available via the iPlayer

Anyone with enough money, be they female, male, gay, straight, single or in a relationship now has the opportunity to try for a baby of their own. By the end of the century, an estimated 157 million people alive or 1.4 % of the world’s population will owe their lives to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF, donor eggs and sperm and surrogacy.

So how are people around the world using these innovations? And how well is society doing in getting to grips with the ethical questions that go hand in hand with the creation of life of in these ways.

The New World Of Reproduction

In part one, Krupa Padhy examines where we have got to after 40 years of IVF. In England, she visits a family made up of white British parents and their three boys, plus a ‘snow baby’: created during an IVF cycle for her Indian-American genetic parents, but adopted as an embryo by her birth family. She hears from ethicists and law makers from around the world about how countries have struggled to adapt to new technological realities, and discovers stories that challenge ideas of what IVF is for, like that of an Indian woman who used her dead son’s sperm to create grandchildren.

Assisted Reproduction

How humans make babies could be about to change, thanks to advances in IVF and reproductive technology. Krupa Padhy meets the new kinds of families that could become the norm, and explores how reproductive technology may soon alter the way all of us make babies.


Conference: Boundaries, Bodies, Borders: The Global Exchange of Human Body Parts

27 March 2017

5th May 2017, University of Leeds

10.00-16.30, Social Sciences Building, room 12.21-12.25

Call for abstracts

The global movement of donated human body parts (e.g., blood, embryos, organs, sperm, oocytes) have gained increasing academic attention. A large part of these accounts express concerns regarding unequal power relationships between countries and between the parties engaged in medically related relationships (recipients, medical staff and medical facilities, providers of organs, tissues or cells etc.).

We wish to invite postgraduate students and early career researchers to explore the processes of meaning making in relation to body parts exchanges, and think about the following questions:

•      how do understandings of various technical procedures, bodies and body parts, and relationships (such as exchange relationships) emerge?

•      who does participate in framing them?

•      how do these understandings direct the flows of body parts across borders?

We welcome contributions that analyse how different actors delineate the boundaries between science, ethics, law and other types of authority as part of their valuation performance, and how they manage uncertainty and risk in the process.

Abstract submission

Please send abstracts (150-250 words) to A Gruian, ssag [at] leeds.ac.uk, by 3rd April 2017

Speakers

The event will be chaired by Dr Ana Manzano (University of Leeds). Speakers:

• Prof Ruth Holliday (University of Leeds).Medical Mobilities: Economies and Ethics

• Dr Sean Columb (Liverpool Law School). Organ markets & exploitation: Assessing the impact of crime and immigration controls in the Egyptian-Sudanese context

• Dr Mark Monaghan (Loughborough University). Conceptualising Crime, Evidence, and Immorality

• Dr Greg Moorlock (University of Warwick). Beauty Contests & Directed Altruistic Donation

• Alexandra Gruian (University of Leeds). Ova Flows in Romania: Definitions, Legitimacy, Legality

Registration fees

• BSA members: £10                 Non-members: £25

• We offer 5 bursaries for postgraduate students. Fee includes lunch and refreshments

• Register here.


Conference: Health Law and the UK: Where Now After Brexit?

6 December 2016
Thursday 4th May 2017
Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham

As policy  makers and lawyers grapple with the aftermath of the EU Referendum this conference explores the  implications and  challenges of Brexit for UK Health Law.  Papers will include ‘Brexit: an opportunity to rationalise bioethics governance in the U.K.?; the impact of Brexit for  public health law; “Clinical Trials in the UK: Where Now After Brexit”;  the implications of Brexit for reproductive choice; “Open for Business – Risks to Public Health from International Commerce After Brexit”; “Research Regulation: A leap in the Dark”; privacy health and data protection post Brexit; and “Pharmaceutical regulation: another fine mess they’ve got us into”.

Speakers include:

Professor Emma Cave, Durham Law School

Professor John Coggon, Bristol Law School

Dr Mairead Enright, Birmingham Law School

Professor Graeme Laurie, University of Edinburgh

Dr Samantha Halliday, Leeds Law School

Professor Tamara Hervey, Sheffield Law Schools

Dr Mark Flear, Queens University Belfast Law School

Professor Jean McHale, Centre for Health Law Science and Policy, Birmingham Law School

Professor Jonathan Montgomery, Faculty of Laws UCL

Professor Chris Newdick,  School of Law, University of Reading

Professor Keith Syrett, Cardiff Law School

Dr Mark Taylor, Sheffield Law School

Registration is now open. The full programme is available here.

For further information contact Jean McHale – j.v.mchale [at] bham.ac.uk


Radio: BBC World Service ‘Womb for Rent’

1 August 2011

BBC World Service, broadcast in July but available to listen online and as a podcast

An interesting documentary on surrogacy in India including extensive interviews with an Irish commissioning mother and her Indian gestational surrogate. A BBC news article includes links to the stream and the podcast.