Course: Summerschool on Health Law and Ethics, Rotterdam

28 March 2017

28 June – 7 July 2017

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy & Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school on Health Law and Ethics, providing students, academics, professionals and practitioners, with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period (you can sign up for 1 week or 2 weeks), while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field. A flyer is available here.


Job: Policy Analyst (Humanities) at the PHG Foundation, Cambridge

20 March 2017

Salary: £28,000 to £35,000 p.a. plus benefits
Closes: 7th April 2017
Full time or part time (min 28 hours p.w.)
Fixed Term contract for 3 years

This is a great opportunity for a social scientist/philosopher/lawyer with an interest in health policy to work with a world-leading think tank that uses research, analysis and advocacy to accelerate the impact of cutting edge biomedical science in healthcare.

As part of our busy team, you will have many opportunities to challenge yourself and to learn more about both exciting advances in biomedicine and the social, ethical, political and legal contexts that impact on their use in healthcare.

To succeed in the role you will have humanities and scientific expertise with ideally a good first degree in a relevant humanities subject (e.g. law, social sciences or philosophy). A postgraduate academic or professional qualification in health/medical law and ethics or biological science, medicine, public health or public policy is desirable.

You will have strong project management skills, a talent for writing and communicating complex issues to a variety of audiences and an ambition to influence public policy through your work. You must have the personal qualities to work well with fellow professionals and experts in a multidisciplinary environment, on interesting policy projects that combine the latest science and technologies with their ethical, legal, social and economic implications. You will also be committed to helping the PHG Foundation to further develop its reputation as an independent health policy think-tank.

You can download an application pack and details of how to apply from our website.

For an informal discussion contact Alison Hall at alison.hall [at] phgfoundation.org

Interviews will be held in Cambridge on 3 May 2017.


Play: Bodies by Vivienne Franzmann

20 February 2017

 

“We should have brought a gift.”

“We’ve brought a gift. It’s called 22 thousand pounds.”

Purchased from Russia. Developed in India. Delivered to the UK.

A global transaction over nine months that offers ‘a lifetime of happiness’ to all involved.

“What do you think will happen to a baby girl in India that nobody wants?”

Vivienne Franzmann’s previous work at the Royal Court includes Pests and The Witness. Her new play Bodies will be directed by Jude Christian (Lela & Co.).

Wed 5 Jul – Sat 12 Aug

Jerwood Theatre Upstairs, Royal Court Theatre

Tickets from £12. General booking opens on Wed 22 Feb at 10am.


Study: Health Law and Ethics at Erasmus University Rotterdam

10 February 2017

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy & Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school on Health Law and Ethics, providing students, academics, professionals and practitioners, with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period (you can sign up for 1 week or 2 weeks), while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field.

The course is designed to enhance the preparation of health professionals confronted with legal and ethical issues. The course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of health law and ethics. A Certificate of Attendance will be presented to participants who wish to take the course for academic credit. 


Conference: BIOETHICS, MEDICAL ETHICS & HEALTH LAW

10 February 2017

St. Raphael Hotel Resort & Congress Center Limassol, Cyprus  March 21-23, 2017

Invitation and Call for Abstracts
The UNESCO Chair in Bioethics is pleased to invite you to become an active participant at the 12th World Conference. The Conference is designed to offer a platform for the exchange of information and knowledge and to hold discussions, lectures, workshops and exhibition of programs and databases. If you wish to take part in the scientific program, submit your abstract to: confer [at] isas.co.il

Abstracts of approximately 250 words on any of the listed topics are invited for oral or poster presentation.

Target Groups
physicians
nurses
social workers
psychologists
psychiatrists
doctors involved in legal medicine
lawyers
judges
bioethicists
philosophers
researchers
writers
ethics committee members
teachers
educators
rectors, deans and administrators of academic institutes
hospital managers
teachers and students of medical, nursing, ethics, psychology, philosophy and law schools and faculties
professional, cultural and volunteer organizations and associations
governmental & public bodies
speech and language therapists
veterinarians
nutritionists & dietitians

Main Topics
Alcohol
Assisted Suicide
Autonomy
Benefit & Harm
Bioethics: Gender
Bioethics: General
Bioethics: History & Future
Clinical Trials
Confidentiality
Cultural Pluralism
Dentistry, Law and Ethics
Discrimination
Drugs
End of Life
Environment’s Protection
Equality
Ethical Aspects of E-Medicine
Ethical Aspects of Toxicology
Ethical Education: Skills & Technology
Ethical Ethics: The Digital Era
Ethics and Immigration
Ethics Committees
Ethics Education: Tools and Methods
Ethics Education: Youth and Children
Food and Death
Forensic Medicine
Genetics: Ethical Aspects
Healthcare Services and Costs
Human Dignity
Human Life: Sacred Life, Quality of Life
Human Rights
Informed Consent
Justice
Medical Errors
Medical Ethics
Medical Ethics and Law: Patents
Medical Ethics in Times of Crisis
Medical Ethics: Globalization
Medical Ethics: Management
Medical Ethics: Surgery
Medical Law
Medical Negligence
Medical Research
Mental Disorders
Neuro-ethics
Nursing, Law and Ethics
Organ Transplantation
Psychiatry, Law and Ethics
Psychology, Law and Ethics
Reproduction
Solidarity


Job: Research Associate in Ethics at Lancaster University

22 December 2016

The Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University invites applications for a full-time Research Associate position. This is a 15-month fixed term post running from 3rd April 2017.

You will support a programme of research called The Donation and Transfer of Human Reproductive Materials, led by Professor Rosamund Scott (King’s College London) and Professor Stephen Wilkinson (Lancaster University). The programme is funded by a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award in Ethics and Society.

This post will facilitate and advance the programme’s aims and outputs, and you will be expected to work flexibly in a number of different areas to achieve this. You will focus predominantly on ethical and philosophical issues, but may also be required to work with relevant legal and scientific materials. You will also spend a minority of your working time (maximum 25%) providing teaching and supervision, and undertaking other work to support teaching, learning, and student recruitment activities.

Interview Date: Thursday 09 March 2017


Lecture: Mary Donnelly on Rebalancing Empowerment and Protection: Evolving Legal Frameworks for Impaired Capacity

28 November 2016

Thursday 8 December 2016, 18:00 – 19:00

UCL Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

Current Legal Problems series

Speaker: Professor Mary Donnelly (University College Cork)
Chair: TBC
Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA and BSB

Admission: Free, Registration required (here)

The past decade has seen a notable evolution in the normative context for law’s response to people with impaired capacity. Driven by a range of factors, including greater recognition of human rights (perhaps most notably through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities) and better empirical understandings, a rhetoric of inclusion and empowerment has replaced traditional approaches centred on control and protection.  Law reform projects in various jurisdictions (Australia, Canada, Ireland, Northern Ireland) have attempted to develop legislative frameworks to give effect to these emerging norms. Yet there is also another narrative. Concerns are expressed (perhaps most commonly by frontline professionals: healthcare professionals, lawyers, social workers and sometimes by family members of people with impaired capacity) that something important may be lost where there is a devaluation of protective norms. There is also a dissonance between the abstract ideals of human rights on the one hand and on the other, the complex corporeal, economic, family, phenomenological and social context within which people with impaired capacity, and those who care for/about them, live.

Tensions between empowerment and protection norms and between abstract, rights-based and contextual, evidence-based policy drivers are inevitable by-products of law’s evolution and they play a necessary role in the development of the law in this area. Rebalancing is a process and not a once-off event. And, of course, as revealed by even a minimal consideration of earlier legal responses to impaired capacity, there is a good deal of room for evolutionary wrong-turns and for unexpected and undesirable consequences. Placing current debates about how law should respond to impaired capacity within an evolutionary context, this paper identifies and evaluates the range of ways in which contemporary tensions may be resolved.

About the speaker:

Mary Donnelly is a Professor in the Law School, University College Cork. Her books include Consent: Bridging the Gap Between Doctor and Patient (Cork: Cork University Press, 2002); Healthcare Decision-Making and the Law: Autonomy, Capacity and the Limits of Liberalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010) and The Law of Credit and Security (Dublin: Round Hall Thomson Reuters, 2011; 2nd ed, 2015) and she is co-author of End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law (Cork University Press, 2011) and Consumer Law: Rights and Regulation (Dublin: Round Hall Thomson Reuters, 2014) and co-editor of Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester University Press, 2016).

She has collaborated on projects funded by the European Commission, the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences, the National Children’s Office and the Irish Hospice Foundation and has acted as consultant for public agencies and legal firms.  She is/has been a member of the Expert Group to review the Mental Health Act 2001 and of the HSE National Consent Advisory Group and the HSE National Assisted Decision Making Steering Group.