Course: Summer school – Doctors and lawyers dealing with death and dying

31 March 2017

 

Medical, legal and ethical challenges in end-of-life decision making. 3-7 July 2017

Preliminary Program Summer School

The Erasmus School of Law in collaboration with the department of Public Health of the Erasmus Medical Center (Erasmus MC) will host the international summer school ‘’Doctors and lawyers dealing with death and dying’’ in the first week of July 2017 in Rotterdam.

Many countries are currently engaged in a societal debate about the question whether to decriminalize or legalize some form of assistance in dying. In this multi-disciplinary one-week course, students will be introduced to the Dutch situation regarding Termination of Life on Request and Assisted Suicide (Review Procedures) Act of 2002, the practice of medical decision making at the end of life, and current ethical, legal and medical challenges in comparative perspective with other European countries.

The aim of this course is to expand the knowledge of participants on medical, legal, and ethical issues at the end of life, and to reflect on these issues based on the facts and figures. The summer school is part of a broader Research Excellence Initiative (REI) ‘’Doctors and lawyers dealing with death and dying’’.

 


Course: Summerschool on Health Law and Ethics, Rotterdam

28 March 2017

28 June – 7 July 2017

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy & Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school on Health Law and Ethics, providing students, academics, professionals and practitioners, with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period (you can sign up for 1 week or 2 weeks), while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field. A flyer is available here.


Study: Health Law and Ethics at Erasmus University Rotterdam

10 February 2017

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy & Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school on Health Law and Ethics, providing students, academics, professionals and practitioners, with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period (you can sign up for 1 week or 2 weeks), while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field.

The course is designed to enhance the preparation of health professionals confronted with legal and ethical issues. The course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of health law and ethics. A Certificate of Attendance will be presented to participants who wish to take the course for academic credit. 


PhD: ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice: Finance and Medicine’ at the University of Sheffield – Philosophy

19 January 2017

‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice: Finance and Medicine’ is a collaborative research project in applied epistemology and ethics between the University of Gröningen, the University of Sheffield and CUNY Graduate Center, sponsored by the Dutch Research Council (NWO) led by Profs Boudewijn de Bruin (Gröningen) and Miranda Fricker (CUNY Graduate Center/Sheffield).

This PhD studentship commences on 1 September 2017. The successful candidate will spend three years pursuing research for the Sheffield PhD in Philosophy, and they will be expected to visit Gröningen during their second year. They may also visit CUNY Graduate Center in New York, though there is not at present any extra funding for those purposes. After completion of the Sheffield PhD at the end of Year Three, they will spend Year Four in Gröningen pursuing research leading to a second PhD in Philosophy or in Economics from the University of Gröningen.

Supervision will be shared between Profs de Bruin and Fricker, with further supervisory support given by colleagues at Sheffield. Details of the overall project available on request from mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu

Requirements

The studentship is open to students of any nationality. Normally, candidates should have completed a minimum of two years’ full-time undergraduate study in Philosophy, and have gained a good 2.1 BA Honours Degree (67%) or equivalent (US GPA 3.6). Candidates should have completed a Master’s course (or equivalent) in Philosophy, with a substantial research component, achieving a grade equivalent to 67%. It is desirable that candidates also have some knowledge of Finance or Medicine.

Please see www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/info/englang for English Language requirements.

Application Process

Candidates should submit an application for the Sheffield PhD via www.sheffield.ac.uk/philosophy/prospectivepostgraduates/applying

using the heading ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice studentship’.

Applying for a studentship in this project does not preclude applicants from applying for other sources of funding for their PhD.

In their online research proposal (900-1000 words), candidates should make clear how their background and interests make them a suitable candidate for the Towards Professional Epistemic Justice project, and explain the specific lines of enquiry they would wish to pursue within the framework of the project and the branch of it (epistemic justice and finance/ medicine) in which they wish to situate their thesis. Candidates may propose any project they see as broadly fitting these themes. Topics covered might include the structure of virtue and/or vice, virtues of epistemic justice, individual and collective or institutional virtues and vices, procedural remedies for biased outcomes, overcoming implicit bias, self-trust, self-fulfilling testimonial injustice, recognition theory, broader issues of justice and injustice in medicine and/or finance etc.

Candidates must also send an email message to Professor Fricker, mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu notifying her that an application has been submitted and giving her the application number using ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice studentship’ in the subject line.

Interviews (probably by Skype or FaceTime) will be held in March 2017.

For further information, please contact Prof Miranda Fricker (mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu) and/or Prof Boudewijn de Bruin (b.p.de.bruin [at] rug.nl).

Funding Details

The studentship is funded from 1/9/2107 to 31/7/2021 directly by the University of Gröningen. It pays €28,498 (Year 1), €33,201 (Year 2), €34,778 (Year 3) and €31,245 (Year 4 until 31/7/2021) and are subject to Dutch tax law. These funds are to pay course fees at Sheffield and to provide maintenance.

Location of PhD

University of Sheffield (3 years)

University of Groningen (1 year)


Radio: When assisted death is legal

19 February 2013

BBC World Service

Episode 1: Tuesday 19 February 2013 at 9.05, 13.05, 16.05, 20.05, Wednesday 20 February at 02.05, Saturday 23 February at 19.05, Sunday 24 February at 13.05, also available via the iPlayer

Episode 2: Wednesday 20 February 2013 at 9.05, 13.05, 16.05, 20.05, Thursday 21 February at 02.05, Sunday 24 February at 22.05, also available via the iPlayer after first broadcast

From the programme’s website: “The debate over assisted suicide and euthanasia is a passionate one. But as the discussions continue to rage around the world, there are a few places where assisted death is already legal. Switzerland, Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Oregon and Washington States in the US all have laws permitting assisted suicide or euthanasia in some form. In this two-part documentary for the BBC World Service, actress and broadcaster Liz Carr goes on a personal journey to all six places to see how it works. As a long-standing campaigner against assisted suicide legislation in the UK, she wants to find out what assisted death means in practice – and whether she’s right to be concerned. In part one, Carr travels to Switzerland, where she visits the rooms where volunteers help people die, and finds out why the Swiss law on assisted suicide goes back to the 19th Century. In Belgium she meets a doctor who admits to performing euthanasia before it was legal; and in Luxembourg, she finds out why the law on assisted suicide nearly caused a constitutional crisis. Carr questions whether it is possible to balance the right of the individual who wants to die with the responsibility of society to protect those who don’t. … In part two, Carr visits the Netherlands, where she meets the group behind the ‘mobile euthanasia units’ which hit the headlines last year, and asks whether a law on voluntary life-ending procedures might open the door to involuntary ones. She also visits Oregon and Washington State in the US, where she finds out who is most likely to use the Death with Dignity law, and hears about the cancer patient whose health-care plan refused to pay for chemotherapy – but offered assisted suicide instead.”

In the first episode, Carr states that in Belgium, only euthanasia (termination of life on request) is lawful, and that assisted suicide is therefore not practised (lawfully). It is correct that in Belgium, the Euthanasia Act 2002 allows only physicians to perform euthanasia (understood in the Netherlands as termination of life on request). Assisted suicide is not explicitly covered, but Belgium’s oversight body, the Federal Control and Evaluation Commission (Commission Féderale de Contrôle et Évaluation or CFCE), accepted early on that cases of assisted suicide fall under the law (Commission fédérale de contrôle et d’évaluation de l’euthanasie, Premier rapport aux chambres legislatives (2002–2003), 2004, pp 13–14). Cases of assisted suicide are now reported to the CFCE and reviewed in the same way as cases of termination of life on request. In 2010-2011, eight such cases were reported (out of a total of 2086 cases) (Commission fédérale de contrôle et d’évaluation de l’euthanasie, Cinquième rapport aux chambres legislatives (2010–2011), 2012, p 17).


Summer School on Health Law and Ethics

13 February 2013

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy &  Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school programme on Health Law and Ethics (24 June – 5 July 2013), providing students, professionals and practitioners ((law, (bio)medical sciences, philosophy, health sciences, policy makers, health insurers, managers and everybody else who is interesting in Health Law and Ethics)) with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period, while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field.

The course is designed to enhance the preparation of health professionals confronted with legal and ethical issues. The course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of health law and ethics. A Certificate of Attendance will be presented to participants who wish to take the course for academic credit.


TV: evidence cited by Sir Terry Pratchett on assisted dying

2 February 2010

In his lecture Shaking Hands with Death, Sir Terry Pratchett referred to an article from the Journal of Medical Ethics which examined the impact on vulnerable groups of assisted dying in the permissive jurisdictions of Oregon and the Netherlands. The article is Battin et al, ‘Legal physician-assisted dying in Oregon and the Netherlands: evidence concerning the impact on patients in “vulnerable” groups’ (2007) 33 J Med Ethics 591-7. You can read the abstract, and if you have access via Athens, the full-text.