Conference: Healthcare Disparities: Disruptive Healthcare Technologies and the Patient in Manchester

20 February 2019

12-14 June 2019

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION EXTENDED TO 30th April 2019

The question of health inequalities worldwide has become increasingly significant and there is now a wide range of active researchers from a variety of disciplines working in this field. This conference is intended to bring these people together for the first meeting of what is hoped will be an ongoing global academic network.

The conference is sponsored by the Hallsworth Endowment and the School of Law at the University of Manchester. Collaborative institutional support is provided by Queen Mary, University of London with further support from the European Association of Health Law and the World Association of Medical Law. The conference will combine keynote and breakout sessions. Further details about this are available from Nicola.Glover-Thomas [at] manchester.ac.uk.

The conference PGR day for postgraduate students will be held on Wednesday 12th June 2019. Details about this event are available from Ajmal Mubarik (ajmal.mubarik [at] postgrad.manchester.ac.uk).

NB There are 12 free PGRs places for the PGR pre-conference workshop available thanks to funding from the Society of Legal Scholars. PGRs may apply for funding for the conference and travel and subsistence

The conference organisers have secured a special issue of The Journal of Medical Law and Ethics to enable selected papers from the conference to be published. Those who are presenting papers and are interested in publishing their paper in the journal, please get in touch with Nicola Glover-Thomas.

Cost: £200 (Registration closes: 31 May 2019)

Early Bird Registration: £175 (Early Bird Registration closes 5 May 2019)

Discounted price for PGRs/ECRs/Members of WAML and EAHL: £150

The conference dinner will be held on Friday 14 June 2019. This is not included in the conference fee. A wine reception, included in the conference fee, will be held in the Schuster Building, University of Manchester on Thursday 13 June 2019 from 7pm – 9pm.

Accommodation at The Crowne Plaza, Oxford Road, has been secured at a reduced rate of £112 for the room per night and £10 for breakfast. We have a limited number of hotel rooms for delegates and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis.


Conference: ‘A Right to Die?’ – Socio-legal perspectives at Keele University

6 March 2017

18th July 2017

School of Law, Keele University

Register here

Programme

10.00 Registration & Coffee

10.30 Welcome from Professor Alison Brammer, Head of Keele Law School

10:35 Introduction by Chair, Dr Sue Westwood

10.40 Keynote speaker: Professor Penney Lewis, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London (‘Assisted Dying and Legal Change’)

11.10 Q&A

11.20 – 12.30 Panel 1: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Current Debates. Chair: Dr Anthony Wrigley

Speaker (1) Dr Iain Brassington, University of Manchester (‘Overview of Debates’)

Speaker (2) Professor Richard Huxtable, University of Bristol (‘Euthanasia, Ethics and the Law’)

Speaker (3) Professor Alison Brammer, Keele University (‘Safeguarding Issues’)

12.20 Q&A

12.30 – 1.15 Lunch

1.15 – 2.40 Panel 2: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Views. Chair: Professor Marie-Andre Jacob

Speaker (1) Professor Clare Wilkinson, Bangor University (‘Why do we want the right to die?)

Speaker (2) Dr Glenys Caswell, University of Nottingham (‘Agency, death and dying in the UK’)

Speaker (3) Davina Hehir, Director of Legal Strategy and Policy, Dignity in Dying (‘Choice, control and access to services at the end of life: Advocating for the right to die’)

2.30 Q&A

2.40 – 3.00 Tea Break

3.00 – 4.10 Panel 3: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Subjectivities Chair: Dr Tsachi Keren-Perez

Speaker (1) Professor Celia Kitzinger, University of York (‘Court applications for withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from patients in a permanent vegetative state: Family experiences’)

Speaker (2) Dr Sue Westwood, Keele University (‘Older lesbians, gay men and the “right to die” debate’)

Speaker (3) Professor Sue Read & Dr Sotirios Santatzoglou, Keele University (‘Exploring hospice care from the perspectives of people living with multiple sclerosis: An exploratory case study’)

4.00 Q&A

4.10 – 4.15 Closing comments (Chair)

4.15 Close


Seminar: Current Legal Challenges for the NHS

10 November 2016

Date: Wednesday 23rd November 2016  6.00pm – 7.00pm, followed by a drinks reception

Venue: 39 Essex Chambers, 81 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1DD

Topics to be covered include:

  • NHS consultations – general principles
  • Public sector equality duty – potential pitfalls
  • Sustainability and Transformation Plans – the future of the NHS

RSVP TO peter.campbell [AT] 39essex.com


Lecture: Disabling Legal Barriers – The inaugural lecture of Professor Oliver Lewis, KCL MA Medical Ethics and Law alumnus

28 September 2016

 

3rd November 2016, 5pm

Moot Court Room
Liberty Building
School of Law
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

This lecture will review the impact of strategic human rights litigation as a tool that can expose and demolish barriers that prevent people with mental health issues or learning disabilities from enjoying equality, inclusion and justice. Oliver will draw on fifteen years work in central and eastern Europe with the Mental Disability Advocacy Centre, an international NGO that collaborates with the University and offer students an opportunity to engage with its litigation and advocacy.

Dr Oliver Lewis was called to the Bar in 2000 and is an associate barrister at Doughty Street Chambers, London. He is the Executive Director of the Mental Disability Advocacy Centre, an international NGO that uses law to secure equality, inclusion and justice for people with mental health issues or learning disabilities worldwide. He is a recurrent visiting professor in law at the Central European University where he developed a LLM module on ‘Mental disability law and advocacy”, and a faculty member at the Indian Law Society where he teaches an international diploma on mental health and human rights law. He is a trustee of the Avon and Bristol Law Centre, and a member of PILNet’s Hungary board. He is interested in how law serves both as a barrier to social inclusion and as method of addressing injustice. His research has focused on international human rights law and mechanisms, human rights monitoring (including monitoring closed institutions such as psychiatric hospitals), strategic litigation, legal capacity, mental health law, political participation and the right to life.

He served as research director for the first disability project of the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights, and has been retained as an expert to organisations such as the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights.

Register via Eventbrite.

 


Lecture: How mental health law discriminates unfairly against people with mental illness

11 November 2010

15 November 2010, 1pm at Barnard’s Inn Hall, Gresham College

Speaker:   Professor George Szmukler, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London

Mental health legislation in most jurisdictions (including England and Wales) discriminates against people with a mental illness. When it comes to involuntary treatment, it fails to respect – without adequate justification – the ‘autonomy’ of people with a mental illness, in stark contrast to the treatment of people with a physical illness.  It further discriminates against persons with a mental disorder by allowing a form of preventive detention on the basis of ‘risk’, without any offence having been committed.  Mental health legislation thus carries underlying assumptions that people with mental disorders are not fully self-determining and that they are inherently dangerous.  It is possible to frame a law based on impaired decision-making capacity, from whatever cause (whether due to a mental or physical disorder), that would counter such discrimination.

Free and open to all.


Jobs: Assistant or Associate Professor of Law at Georgia State

25 August 2010

Georgia State University College of Law is seeking highly qualified applicants for five tenure-track faculty positions, to start in the 2011-2012 academic year, in the following three subject matter areas:

Intellectual Property: We seek candidates who specialize in intellectual property law with a research focus on biotechnology, the life and health sciences, and entrepreneurship.

Health Regulation: We seek candidates who specialize in health law with a research focus on health business regulation law, corporate law and compliance, and ethics of health care businesses and organizations.

Health Equity: We seek candidates with backgrounds in legal disciplines consistent with a research focus on health equity and legal remedies to rectify systemic health disparities.

These three positions are part of a University faculty hiring initiative, called the Second Century Initiative (2CI), to build scholarly research around interdisciplinary research themes.

Candidates for these positions should have strong interdisciplinary research interests that will enable their engagement with the Center for Law, Health & Society and other University units.

Applicants should have a Juris Doctor degree, excellent academic background, and a proven record of (or demonstrated potential for) outstanding scholarship, teaching, and professional engagement. All positions are tenure track, and they are at the assistant or associate professor level commensurate with experience. Applications must be submitted online. Review of applications for these positions will begin in August 2010 and continue until the positions are filled; however, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply before October 1, 2010.

For inquiries only (not applications) related to the 2CI positions, please contact:

Professor Charity Scott
Director, Center for Law, Health & Society
Chair, Faculty Recruitment Committee for Second Century Initiative
recruitment2ci@gsu.edu