Job: Singer Fellowship in Medical Law & Ethics at Exeter College, University of Oxford

26 November 2018

Location: Oxford
Salary: £32,236 to £39,609 per annum (inclusive of College Housing Allowance of £8,897 per annum)
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract
Placed On: 15th November 2018
Closes: 2nd January 2019

Fixed-Term Contract

Salary: £32,236 – £39,609 per annum (inclusive of College Housing Allowance of £8,897 per annum)

(plus other benefits)

Exeter College (part of the University of Oxford) invites applications for the Singer Fellowship in Medical Law & Ethics. The Fellowship, which is strictly temporary, will be tenable for a period of up to 36 months (with effect from 1 September 2019, or as soon as possible thereafter (by negotiation)).

The main duties of the post are to:

  • – engage in advanced study and research;
  • – undertake tutorial or class teaching of undergraduates of Exeter College and the Williams-Exeter Programme at Oxford, up to a maximum of six (‘weighted’) hours per week averaged over the three eight-week Terms of the academic year;
  • – set and mark College examinations;
  • – submit termly reports on students taught;
  • – provide pastoral care for students;
  • – assess and interview in the undergraduate admissions process, and to participate in outreach and access initiatives as appropriate;
  • – undertake such other duties as may reasonably be required to support the teaching of Law at the College; and
  • – participate in the governance of the College as a member of the Governing Body (and therefore a Trustee).

The successful candidate will have:

  • (a) A research record of international standing, appropriate to the stage of the candidate’s career, with evidence of, or evidence of potential for producing, research of international standing in Law;
  • (b) The proven ability, or the potential, to provide excellent tutorial and small group teaching in a range of undergraduate topics;
  • (c) The ability to undertake College administration and duties; and
  • (d) Hold, or be close to holding, a PhD/ DPhil in Law. (Candidates must have been awarded a doctorate as a result of a viva voce examination (or equivalent doctoral defense) held between 1 September 2015 and 31 May 2019 (inclusive).

The Lecturer will be appointed on Grade 7 of the University’s salary scale for academic staff, currently £32,236 – £39,609 per annum (inclusive of the College Housing Allowance (£8,897 per annum)), at a point dependent on experience. In addition to salary, a range of other generous benefits are available, as set out in the Further Particulars.

Further Particulars may be obtained from the Exeter College website at:

https://www.exeter.ox.ac.uk/vacancies/singer-fellowship-in-medical-law-ethics-fixed-term/ 

How to Apply

Candidates are encouraged to submit all application materials by email, to the HR Officer at vacancies@exeter.ox.ac.uk. If possible, applications should be submitted as a single PDF file.

Candidates should ask their referees to write directly to the HR Officer, vacancies@exeter.ox.ac.uk, and should supply each referee with a copy of the Further Particulars.

The closing date for applications, and the last date for receipt of references direct from referees, is 12pm noon (GMT) on Wednesday 2 January 2019. It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure that their application and references arrive before the deadline.


Seminar: religion, pluralism and medical ethics in paediatric intensive care

16 February 2017

May 8 2017, Jesus College Oxford 2pm-5pm, including refreshments

A child is critically ill in the intensive care unit. Doctors believe that the child’s prognosis is very poor and that treatment should be withdrawn. However, her parents do not agree. They say that it is contrary to their religion to stop treatment.

How often is religion a source of disagreement about treatment in intensive care? What are the views of major religions about withdrawing treatment in intensive care? 

Should religious requests for treatment be treated differently from secular requests? Should religious preferences for treatment count in a child? Should religious views be accommodated when providing scarce and expensive medical resources?

Guest Speaker: Prof John Paris S.J., Professor of Bioethics, Boston College

Speakers/ Panel Participants:

John Paris, Joe Brierley, Sarah Barclay, David Jones, John Wyatt, Siddiq Diwan, Dominic Wilkinson

This seminar is aimed at health professionals, ethicists, philosophers, theologians and chaplains. There are strictly limited places.

Early bird registration £15/10* if register by 28th February. £25/20* subsequently.

*Discounted registration for students.

To reserve a place at the seminar, please email rachel.gaminiratne [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk

Questions about the seminar should be directed to Professor Dominic Wilkinson, dominic.wilkinson [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk


Lecture: Disabling Legal Barriers – The inaugural lecture of Professor Oliver Lewis, KCL MA Medical Ethics and Law alumnus

28 September 2016

 

3rd November 2016, 5pm

Moot Court Room
Liberty Building
School of Law
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

This lecture will review the impact of strategic human rights litigation as a tool that can expose and demolish barriers that prevent people with mental health issues or learning disabilities from enjoying equality, inclusion and justice. Oliver will draw on fifteen years work in central and eastern Europe with the Mental Disability Advocacy Centre, an international NGO that collaborates with the University and offer students an opportunity to engage with its litigation and advocacy.

Dr Oliver Lewis was called to the Bar in 2000 and is an associate barrister at Doughty Street Chambers, London. He is the Executive Director of the Mental Disability Advocacy Centre, an international NGO that uses law to secure equality, inclusion and justice for people with mental health issues or learning disabilities worldwide. He is a recurrent visiting professor in law at the Central European University where he developed a LLM module on ‘Mental disability law and advocacy”, and a faculty member at the Indian Law Society where he teaches an international diploma on mental health and human rights law. He is a trustee of the Avon and Bristol Law Centre, and a member of PILNet’s Hungary board. He is interested in how law serves both as a barrier to social inclusion and as method of addressing injustice. His research has focused on international human rights law and mechanisms, human rights monitoring (including monitoring closed institutions such as psychiatric hospitals), strategic litigation, legal capacity, mental health law, political participation and the right to life.

He served as research director for the first disability project of the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights, and has been retained as an expert to organisations such as the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights.

Register via Eventbrite.

 


Job: Postgraduate Research Assistant at the Centre for Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation

11 June 2015

Postgraduate Research Assistant – CASMI

University of Oxford – Investigative Medicine, RDM, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

‘Are you interested in improving the translation of medical technologies? Do you want to get involved in academic and policy work which could help save our NHS and revolutionise our medicines development system?

We are currently looking to recruit a Postgraduate Research Assistant to support research at the Centre for the Advancement of Sustainable Medical Innovation (CASMI). The ideal candidate will lead on our Diabetes Innovation Adoption project as well as contributing to other CASMI work.

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to be the main contributor to this and other research projects at CASMI, supported by our academic fellows and the rest of the CASMI team. You will also contribute to policy projects and events and will have the opportunity to present our work at seminars, poster presentations and as academic and policy papers

It is essential that you have a degree in an appropriate discipline: law, ethics, economics, social sciences, natural sciences or medical sciences. You will also have the ability to write academic papers; experience of qualitative research methods and/or an interest in learning qualitative academic methods; and experience of following and adapting methodologies; as well as good teamwork and independent research.

The position is full-time, and a fixed-term for up to 1 year in the first instance.

Applications for this vacancy are to be made online. You will be required to upload a supporting statement and CV as part of your online application.

Only applications received before 12.00 midday on 17 June 2015 will be considered. Interviews for this post will be held on 2 July 2015.’


Report: The collection, linking and use of data in biomedical research and health care: ethical issues

4 February 2015

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published its report on The collection, linking and use of data in biomedical research and health care: ethical issues.

We are generating more data about people’s health and biology, from more sources, than ever before including GP records, hospital notes, laboratory tests, clinical trials, monitoring devices and health apps.

Advances in information technology and data science mean that it is becoming easier, cheaper and more valuable to gather, transfer, link, store and analyse these data. This offers significant opportunities to generate new knowledge, improve medical practice, increase service efficiency and drive innovation.

The Nuffield Council on Bioethics’ report looks at the ethics of data use by considering the relationship between privacy and public interest, and how developments in data science and computing have put significant pressure on conventional approaches to information governance, including the approach of seeking consent or anonymising data for use in research.

More needs to be done to ensure that respect for participants and the protection of their data is at the centre of any initiative, through participation and accountability, backed up by good governance, and criminal penalties for the misuse of data. To marginalise individuals who provide data means risking the trust of current and future generations, exposing people to unacceptable risks, and ultimately missing out on the benefits of research.

The report sets out key ethical principles for the design and governance of data initiatives, and identifies examples of good practice relevant to anyone approaching a data initiative, such as a principal investigator in a research project, lead policy official or commissioner of services.

If you would like to receive a printed copy of the report, please email bioethics@nuffieldbioethics.org (reports are free to order on or before 10 February 2015)

To view it online or for further details go here.


PhD scholarship: Neuroethics at Monash University

29 January 2015

Closing date for expressions of interest: Friday 26 February 2015, 11:55 p.m. Australian Eastern Daylight Time

A PhD scholarship, equivalent to an Australian Postgraduate Award, is available to examine treatment-induced compulsive behaviours in Parkinson’s disease. The Scholarship is provided by an Australia Research Council Discovery Early Career Award received by Dr Adrian Carter (2014-2017) entitled “Treatment-induced compulsive behaviours: Ethical and policy implications”.

Some medications can produce compulsive behaviours that challenge our understanding of decision-making and raise significant ethical questions about our control over and responsibility for our actions. Around one in five individuals receiving dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), usually for Parkinson’s disease, will develop severe compulsive behaviours or impulse control disorders (ICDs). These behaviours, which include pathological gambling, compulsive buying, hypersexuality, Internet addiction, and compulsive eating, can cause significant harm and distress to sufferers and their families. Individuals have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars, homes and businesses from pathological gambling and compulsive buying, while others have developed a compulsive interest in sex that, in some cases, have resulted in criminal prosecutions. These conditions pose an imminent problem not only for these individuals, but also clinicians, judges and loved ones that deal with the consequences of these behaviours.

Very little is known about the impact that these disorders have upon those who suffer from them. Clinicians prescribe these medications with little ethical guidance, while courts make judgements on the culpability of compulsive actions in criminal cases that are minimally informed by the scientific literature. There is also little that can be done to prevent or ameliorate these behaviours other than stopping or reducing a medication that is essential to control life-threatening motor disturbances. There is therefore an urgent need to understand these conditions, the ethical and legal issues that they raise, and to develop more effective methods of minimising their occurrence or the harms that they cause.

The PhD Scholarship aims to:
1. Identify the ethical and legal issues raised by the use of dopaminergic drugs, such as DRT, that cause compulsive behaviour, and the implications they have for agency and moral responsibility.
2. Determine the impact of dopamine-induced compulsive behaviour on affected individuals, including their ability to control their behaviour, their understanding of these behaviours, and their sense of moral agency.
3. Increase knowledge and understanding of the impact of dopaminergic drugs on behaviour and decision-making

Research Plan:
These aims will be achieved using three inter-related methodologies:
1. Critical ethical and policy analysis
2. Qualitative study of affected individuals and clinicians
3. Neuropsychological assessment of persons affected by these disorders.

For further information, including remuneration package, candidate requirements, and application details go here.

Enquiries should be directed to:
Dr Adrian Carter
School of Psychological Sciences
Monash University
adrian.carter@monash.edu
Telephone: +613 9902 9431


Lecture: Nuffield Council Annual Lecture 2015

10 January 2015

‘In conversation with Dr Amy Gutmann’

The British Library Conference Centre on Tuesday 17 March at 6pm – 9pm.

This year, Dr Geoff Watts, member of Council, will host a conversation with Dr Amy Gutmann, Chair of the US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, President and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Professor of Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

Under Dr Gutmann’s leadership, the Commission has advised the Obama Administration on the ethics of synthetic biology and emerging technologies; protecting research participants; whole genome sequencing; clinical research in children; incidental findings in research, clinical, and consumer settings; and neuroscience research.

A political scientist and philosopher, Dr Gutmann has authored numerous articles, essays and books and continues to teach and write on ethics and public policy, democracy and education.

The event is free and open to all but places must be booked in advance. Go here to find out more and book a place.