Job: Associate Professor in Health Law and Regulation at Melbourne Law School

19 January 2017

 

Location: Melbourne
Salary: AU$140,758 to AU$155,072
£84,482.95 to £93,074.21 converted salary* p.a. plus 17% superannuation
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Permanent
Placed on: 9th January 2017
Closes: 28th February 2017
Job Ref: 0042049

About Melbourne Law School
Melbourne Law School (MLS) is Australia’s first all-graduate law faculty. Melbourne Law School was the first faculty in Australia to teach law, and awarded this country’s first law degrees. MLS is ranked the Number 1 Law School in Australia and sits within the top 10 law schools in the world.

About the role:
The position is to take a leadership and management role in developing a successful programme of health law research and teaching alongside Professor Jane Kaye. The position has been established within the Law School but will work closely with the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and other relevant faculties and schools.

About you:
The successful incumbent will ideally be experienced in establishing collaborations and developing research projects with healthcare professionals working in innovative areas of translational research. In addition, they will be expected to contribute more generally to the work of the Melbourne Law School in teaching and learning, research, engagement and leadership and service. For the first five years of the appointment, they will teach one subject in either the Melbourne Juris Doctor (JD) programme or the Melbourne Law Masters (MLM) in medical and health law. After that time they may be required to take on a full teaching load.

Melbourne Law School is an equal opportunity employer, and welcomes applications from scholars able to enrich the diversity of our community. In particular, we encourage Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

Employment Type: Full-time continuing position

Enquiries only to: Professor Jane Kaye, Email jane.kaye [at] law.ox.ac.uk

Close date: 28 Feb 2017

For position information and to apply online go to: http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers, click on the relevant option (‘Current Staff’ or ‘Prospective Staff’)  and search under the job title or job number 0042049.

Advertisements

Job: Associate Professor in Health Law and Regulation at Melbourne Law School

5 December 2016

Salary: AU$140,758 to AU$155,072 = £82,667.17 to £91,073.79
Applications Due: 11th December 2016

Melbourne Law School (MLS) is Australia’s first all-graduate law faculty. Melbourne Law School was the first faculty in Australia to teach law, and awarded this country’s first law degrees. MLS is ranked the Number 1 Law School in Australia and sits within the top 10 law schools in the world.

The position is to take a leadership and management role in developing a successful programme of health law research and teaching alongside Professor Jane Kaye. The position has been established within the Law School but will work closely with the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and other relevant faculties and schools.

The successful incumbent will ideally be experienced in establishing collaborations and developing research projects with healthcare professionals working in innovative areas of translational research. In addition, they will be expected to contribute more generally to the work of the Melbourne Law School in teaching and learning, research, engagement and leadership and service. For the first five years of the appointment, they will teach one subject in either the Melbourne Juris Doctor (JD) programme or the Melbourne Law Masters (MLM) in medical and health law. After that time they may be required to take on a full teaching load.

Melbourne Law School is an equal opportunity employer, and welcomes applications from scholars able to enrich the diversity of our community. In particular, we encourage Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

 


Seminar: Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation

22 November 2016

IALS Legal History Seminar

02 Dec 2016, 18:00 to 20:00
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Professor Mark Lunney, University of New England, Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation: Section 4 of the ‘Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1944’ (NSW)

This event is free but advance booking is requested.

Organised in association with the London Legal History seminar.


Job: Senior Lecturer or Lecturer in Law and Medicine/Health Law at the University of Tasmania

7 June 2013

The University of Tasmania has advertised the appointment of a Senior Lecturer or Lecturer in Law and Medicine/Health Law to teach and conduct research in health law or another medico-legal field in collaboration with the  Centre for Law and Genetics within the Faculty of Law and the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania.

The Faculty of Law at the University of Tasmania is one of Australia’s premier law schools.  It has a long and distinguished history and strong reputation nationally and internationally for high quality research and success with competitive grant funding.

Applicants will have a PhD and a strong record of research, commitment to high quality teaching and effective research training, and demonstrated success in course design, development and evaluation.

This full time, continuing appointment will be made at either Level B or C in line with Opening to Talent: The UTAS Academic and is based in Hobart.

Further information is available from the UTAS website or from Jandy.Godfrey [at] utas.edu.au.


Post-doctoral fellowships: University of Technology Sydney

16 August 2010

Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

University of Technology Sydney is offering Fellowships to commence in 2011 under the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowships Scheme.

The Fellowships are extremely prestigious and highly competitive. Applicants must have an outstanding track record relative to opportunity in order to be short-listed.

The Fellowships aim to generate research outcomes that will benefit society, strengthen the research profile of UTS and its areas of research strength and excellence, and equip Fellows for research careers.

In 2011, the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Scheme will award Fellowships with the aim of building research capacity in areas of strategic importance to UTS. The number of Fellowships awarded will be dependent on the quality of the candidates and the funding available.

Applicants will have been awarded a research doctoral degree (equivalent to an Australian PhD degree) within 5 years of the closing date. Research doctoral degree candidates whose thesis is under examination at the closing date, and research doctoral degree candidates who will submit their PhD thesis by end of 2010 may also apply. International applications are welcome.

Fellowships are available for a three-year period. A four-year research and teaching option is also available under certain conditions.

Applications close on 26 August 2010.

Isabel Karpin (Isabel.Karpin@uts.edu.au) would be happy to field enquiries from candidates in the field of Health Law.

General enquiries about the scheme should be addressed to:
Helen Thomson
Manager, Research Development
Research and Innovation Office
University of Technology, Sydney
E: Helen.Thomson@uts.edu.au
T: 61 2 9514 9616
F: 61 2 9514 1244


News: the right to refuse life-sustaining treatment in Western Australia

14 August 2009

The Supreme Court of Western Australia has clarified the “legal obligations under Western Australian law of a medical service provider which has assumed responsibility for the care of a mentally-competent patient when that patient clearly and unequivocally stipulates that he does not wish to continue to receive medical services which, if discontinued, will inevitably lead to his death.” The patient in question is Christian Rossiter, a 49 year old quadriplegic from Perth in Western Australia who wishes his care provider to cease the provision of artificial nutrition and “general hydration” (while continuing only the hydration necessary for pain control).

In a draft judgement, the court concluded that Mr. Rossiter was competent, having reviewed reports from a number of experts. Martin CJ confirmed the common law right of a competent patient to refuse medical treatment, including life-sustaining medical treatment. To continue to provide such treatment in the face of such a refusal would constitute a battery (in this jurisdiction, see Re B (adult: refusal of medical treatment) [2002] EWHC 429 (Fam)).

The judgement also considered two sections of Western Australia’s Criminal Code:

259 Surgical and medical treatment

(1) A person is not criminally responsible for administering, in good faith and with reasonable care and skill, surgical or medical treatment (including palliative care) —

(a) to another person for that other person’s benefit; or

(b) to an unborn child for the preservation of the mother’s life,

if the administration of the treatment is reasonable, having regard to the patient’s state at the time and to all the circumstances of the case.

(2) A person is not criminally responsible for not administering or ceasing to administer, in good faith and with reasonable care and skill, surgical or medical treatment (including palliative care) if not administering or ceasing to administer the treatment is reasonable, having regard to the patient’s state at the time and to all the circumstances of the case.

[Section 259 inserted by No. 15 of 1998 s. 5; amended by No. 25 of 2008 s. 18.]

262 Duty to provide necessaries of life

It is the duty of every person having charge of another who is unable by reason of age, sickness, mental impairment, detention, or any other cause, to withdraw himself from such charge, and who is unable to provide himself with the necessaries of life, whether the charge is undertaken under a contract, or is imposed by law, or arises by reason of any act, whether lawful or unlawful, of the person who has such charge, to provide for that other person the necessaries of life; and he is held to have caused any consequences which result to the life or health of the other person by reason of any omission to perform that duty.

[Section 262 amended by No. 69 of 1996 s. 10.]

Having concluded that s.262 did not apply, as Mr. Rossiter was able to withdraw himself from the charge of his current care provider, Martin CJ moved on to consider s.259(2), holding that in the circumstances it would be “reasonable” not to continue to administer a treatment refused by the competent Mr. Rossiter, relying on his common law right to refuse treatment.

On the issue of palliative care to be provided to Mr. Rossiter after the discontinuance of artificial nutrition and “general hydration”, Martin CJ held that the defence in s.259(1) would apply: “there is no reason why section 259(1) would not apply to the provision of palliative care to Mr Rossiter even though the occasion for the provision of that palliative care might come about as a consequence of Mr Rossiter’s informed decision to discontinue the treatment necessary to sustain his life.”


New development in Australian euthanasia prosecution

22 September 2008

A woman suffering from terminal cancer, who was earlier this year found guilty of involvement in a euthanasia case, has taken her own life. Details are here, and details of the earlier prosecution are here.