Seminar: Autonomy, ignorance and informed consent

10 November 2016

Arnon Keren (University of Haifa / King’s College London): Autonomy, ignorance and informed consent

 

5 December 2016, 16:00-17:30
King’s College London, Strand Campus, Somerset House East Wing, SW1.18 (Moot Court)

London Bioethics Colloquium 2016-17

All welcome, no need to register.

 


Conference: Freedom and Autonomy

22 December 2014

18th International Graduate Conference in Philosophy
 9 May 2015, University of Essex

Call for papers deadline: 1 February 2014

Keynote speakers
Dr Katerina Deligiorgi, University of Sussex
Professor Wayne Martin, University of Essex

Call for papers
The question of human freedom is one of the great problems in philosophy since Kant. The issue is crystalised in the Third Antinomy, which resonated so much in the work of his successors: how can we conceive of an agent that is at once wholly determined (from the perspective of natural science) yet also (practically) free? Have attempts to overcome this problematic been so many dead ends, or should the matter have long ago been settled on one side or the other (or perhaps under the banner of Strawson’s compatibilism)? And what is the greater significance of the debate? Can one, for instance, have autonomy without freedom? How should we think of ourselves as being guided (or even limited) by the world – or our instincts – in our actions and judgements?

These are the sorts of questions that our graduate conference at Essex will be exploring this year. We’re interested in answering them both with reference to the history of philosophy as well as in relation to contemporary debates (for instance, Essex has recently been home to the AHRC-funded Essex Autonomy Project, which was in large part focused on the application of philosophical debates about autonomy to medical ethics). In particular, we’re interested in ‘freedom’ not just in a metaphysical sense but in a practical one too.

We invite abstracts for 30-minute presentations relating to any aspect of the conference themes, from any tradition of philosophy. Abstracts should be of any reasonable length (200-500 words). All speakers should be currently undertaking graduate research in Philosophy or some other graduate research pertaining to philosophy (e.g. political theory).
Please send abstracts and all other inquiries to pygradc@essex.ac.uk. Web link here.


Conference: Autonomy and the Other

16 November 2014

Friday 28 November 2014, 9.30am-5pm, at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, London

A Day Conference on the Nature and Applications of Autonomy

Deadline for Registration: 21st November 2014

Autonomy is central to bio-medical practice and, arguably, has become the dominant principle governing bioethical decision making. Practitioners are legally (and morally) required to respect the autonomy of patients, i.e. to regard patients as rational beings who will employ their own free will in making decisions about their health in terms of lifestyle and therapy. Yet, the concept of a solitary rational individual making his or her own free decisions has been questioned in recent years. On the one hand, an argument has been made to support a more relational concept of autonomy. On the other hand, it has been questioned whether any attempt to live autonomous lives is an illusion. This day conference will approach these issues both from historical and contemporary, as well as practical perspectives.

Lunch and Refreshment will be provided.

For further details including how to register here or contact Anna Westin at anna.westin@smuc.ac.uk


Radio: drama about adolescent autonomy

17 July 2011

Positive by Tina Pepler, BBC Radio 4, Thursday 21st July 14.15-15.00, available after broadcast via the iPlayer

From the programme’s page:

In the second of two Afternoon Plays commissioned to accompany the current series of Inside the Ethics Committee, a pregnant teenager and her angry mother present the ante-natal team with a series of increasingly difficult decisions. When Annie is admitted to A&E with stomach pains, she’s shocked to find out that she’s pregnant. Her mother is even more horrified, and the ante-natal team must decide if Annie is capable of making her own decisions without her mother’s consent. The situation is further complicated when Annie wants to keep an even more shocking piece of news from her mother, and the medical team’s efforts to support her come under real pressure as an emergency confronts them with a difficult decision about what is best for Annie’s welfare.

Cast:
Rosie: Nicola Miles-Wildin
Theresa: Lucy Black
Jacqui: Susie Ridell
Tess: Deirdre Mullins
Des: Jack Holden
Michael: Gerard Cooke
Paul: Chris Yapp
John: Mark Meadows
Mr Joseph: Russell Boulter
Sam/Lily: Nadia Williams

Directed by Sara Davies


Job: Virtual learning environment project officer

30 November 2010

Essex Autonomy Project
University of Essex – Department of Philosophy
Closing date: 06 December 2010

We are looking to make a nine-month, fixed-term appointment of a Virtual Learning Environment Project Officer (appointment as Senior Research Officer) to develop and roll out a Distance Learning Hub for the research and knowledge exchange project Contested Autonomy in Public Policy and Professional Practice, based in the Department of Philosophy. The postholder will have experiences with distance learning facilities and virtual learning environments. A research background in moral philosophy, political philosophy, applied ethics, law, and/or public policy would be an advantage. The successful candidate will have to be an effective communicator with commitment to fostering interdisciplinary dialogue. A degree in philosophy is not an essential requirement.

The AHRC funded project Contested Autonomy in Public Policy and Professional Practice is part of the Essex Autonomy Project (EAP) — a collaborative, interdisciplinary research initiative of the Philosophy Department at the University of Essex. Its aim is to investigate the ideal of self-determination in human affairs. The AHRC grant is co-directed by Prof. Wayne Martin and Dr. Fabian Freyenhagen and overseen by a Project Planning Team, comprising senior officers of the AHRC, members of EAP, and distinguished practitioners.

The appointee will participate in all aspects of the project. He or she will have special responsibility for developing and rolling out a Distance Learning Hub and will contribute to the delivery of the AHRC Autonomy Summer School, for which the Distance Learning Hub provides one of the key components.

Appointment to this post will be fixed term for the duration of nine months, starting 1 January 2011 or as soon after as possible. Funding for the post is provided until 31 March 2011 in the first instance with the expectation of funding for the remainder pending final approval.

Salary: In the range £29,853 – £30,747 per annum (pro rated for duration of contract). You can apply online.


Job: Senior Research Officer – Contested Autonomy in Public Policy and Professional Practice

24 November 2010

University of Essex, Department of Philosophy

Ref: RE233
Salary: In the range £29,853-£30,747 per annum
Closing date: 06/12/10
Interviews are likely to be held: Monday, 20 December 2010

We are looking to make a fixed-term appointment of a Senior Research Officer to work on the research and knowledge exchange project Contested Autonomy in Public Policy and Professional Practice, based in the Department of Philosophy. The postholder will have a research background in applied ethics, law, and/or public policy. It is our expectation that the successful candidate will have an advanced degree in philosophy, law or related disciplines prior to taking up the post; consideration will be given, however, to candidates for whom completion of the PhD or equivalent is imminent. The successful candidate will have to be an effective communicator with commitment to fostering interdisciplinary dialogue. Applications from candidates with a legal background are encouraged. A degree in philosophy is not an essential requirement.

The AHRC funded project Contested Autonomy in Public Policy and Professional Practice is part of the Essex Autonomy Project (EAP) — a collaborative, interdisciplinary research initiative of the Philosophy Department at the University of Essex. Its aim is to investigate the ideal of self-determination in human affairs. The AHRC grant is co-directed by Prof. Wayne Martin and Dr. Fabian Freyenhagen and overseen by a Project Planning Team, comprising senior officers of the AHRC, members of EAP, and distinguished practitioners.

The appointee will participate in all aspects of the research project, and provide research assistance to the investigators. He or she will have special responsibility for preparing materials relevant to Public Policy Seminars and Knowledge Exchange activities. This will include responsibilities for preparing policy documents and/or curricular materials in one or more of the following areas: Unified Mental Health Legislation; the Mac-CAT(T); Autonomy and Paternalism: An International Comparison. He or she will be centrally involved in planning and routine running of the project, including organising and overseeing events, and taking partial editorial responsibility for resulting publications.

Appointment to this post will be fixed term for duration of one year, starting 1 January 2011 or as soon after as possible. Funding for the post is provided until 31 March 2011 in the first instance with the expectation of funding for the remainder pending final approval.

Further information is available here.


Seminar series: Meaning and Mindedness: Encounters between Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

23 October 2010

Seminar Two: “The Unconscious”
Friday 29 October 2010, 19:00 – 21:00.

Speaker: Candace Vogler (Professor of Philosophy, University of Chicago)
Discussant: David Bell (Psychoanalyst & Consultant Psychotherapist, Tavistock Clinic; President, British Psychoanalytical Society)

All seminars in the series will be held at the Tavistock Centre, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA
For directions please go here.

About the Series

What is it to have a mind? What gives our lives meaning and value? Clinicians touch on these questions daily in their work with patients, drawing on psychological models of human nature and development. But they have also been among the central questions of philosophy from Plato and Aristotle to the present day. This series of interdisciplinary seminars aims to bring together prominent philosophers, clinicians and others with a view to deepening our understanding of these fundamental questions. The series is not intended as a seminar in the philosophy of psychoanalysis – that is, an enterprise in which philosophers are the investigators and psychoanalysts the objects of investigation – but focuses instead on topics that are objects of interest both to psychoanalysis and to philosophy. By exposing clinicians to the way philosophers think about issues relevant for them, and by enabling philosophers to see how their theories might be put to use in work with patients, the series should provide an opportunity to explore the common ground between these two kinds of inquiry, both of which are committed to understanding something of the truth about human nature and human living. The series is equally suited to philosophers (including graduate students in philosophy), clinicians (including those seeking Continuing Professional Development), and to trainees.

Each seminar will last two hours (19:00 – 21:00) and consist of a paper (45 mins), a response (15 mins), followed by discussion. Whenever the paper is presented by a philosopher, the response will be from a clinician and vice versa. All of our speakers are well respected in their own field, but all have been asked to make sure they present their ideas in a way that is accessible not only to fellow specialists, but to a mixed clinical and academic audience from a range of disciplinary backgrounds.

Further seminars will take place as follows:

• Empathy and Knowledge of Others
Friday 26th November 2010, speaker: Peter Goldie (Professor of Philosophy, Manchester), discussant: Peter Hobson (Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, UCL;
Psychoanalyst and Consultant Psychotherapist, Tavistock Clinic)

• Lying and Pretending
Friday 28 January 2011, speaker: Mary Target (Psychoanalyst and Clinical Psychologist; Professor of Psychoanalysis, UCL), discussant: Louise Braddock (Bye-Fellow in
Philosophy, Girton College, Cambridge)

• Intimacy
Friday 25th February 2011, speaker: Jeremy Holmes (Consultant Psychotherapist; Visiting Professor, Clinical Psychology, Exeter), discussant: Simon May (Research Fellow,
Philosophy, Birkbeck)

• The Embodied Mind
25th March 2011, speaker: Shaun Gallagher (Chair and Professor of Philosophy, Director of Cognitive Sciences Program, U. of Central Florida), discussant: Peter Shoenberg
(Consultant Psychiatrist in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist, Camden Psychotherapy Service)

• Autonomy
29th April 2011, speaker: Derek Bolton (Professor of Philosophy and Psychopathology, Institute of Psychiatry, KCL; Hon. Consultant Clinical Psychologist, South London and
Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust), discussant: Margaret Rustin (Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist, Tavistock Clinic)

• Illusion and Belief
27th May 2011, speaker: Leon Kleimberg (Training Analyst, British Psychoanalytical Society; Visiting Lecturer, Psychoanalytic Studies, UCL; Adult Dept., Tavistock Clinic),
discussant: Alan Thomas (Professor of Philosophy, Tilburg)

• Depression
24th June 2011, speaker: Matthew Ratcliffe (Professor of Philosophy, Durham), discussant: David Taylor (Psychoanalyst and Consultant Psychotherapist, Tavistock Clinic)

• Psychoanalysis and Philosophy
8th July 2011, speaker: Michael Brearley (Psychoanalyst; former President, British Psychoanalytical Society), discussant: Michael Rustin (Professor of Sociology, UEL; Visiting
Professor, Tavistock Clinic)

For further details please contact events@tavi-port.org. There is a fee for each seminar of £10 per person, though please note that free places are available for philosophers, philosophy students and clinical trainees. These will be offered first come first served. To book, or to register for a free place, please contact:

Conference, Events and Marketing Unit, The Tavistock Centre, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA
T: 020 8938 2548
F: 020 7447 3837
events@tavi-port.org
http://www.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/cpd15

Organisers: Edward Harcourt, Faculty of Philosophy, Oxford University; Sarah Majid, Adult Department, The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust.

The organizers gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Wellcome Trust.