Seminar: cryopreservation – Law and Ethics at the Frontiers of Medicine and Science

12 June 2017

Date: Wednesday 28 June 2017

Time: 18:30 – 20:00

Registration from 18:15

20:00 onwards drinks reception

Venue: Doughty Street Chambers, 53-54 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LS

Doughty Street Chambers is delighted to invite you to a seminar on Wednesday 28 June on Law and Ethics at the Frontiers of Medicine and Science.

In the recent cryopreservation case In re JS (A Child) [2017] 4 WLR 1, the High Court considered the wishes of a terminally ill 14 year old child that her body be cryopreserved upon her death.  The case focused attention on medical and scientific advances not covered or contemplated by existing laws, such as the Human Tissue Act 2004.  How should courts, regulatory bodies, policy makers and lawyers respond?

Doughty Street Chambers convenes a panel of speakers – including lawyers who acted in the JS case and the Director of Regulation at the Human Tissue Authority – to discuss whether the current legal and regulatory framework is keeping up with developments in medicine and science in the 21st century.

The talks will be followed by drinks and networking.

If you would like to secure a place please click here.

 

Chair
Aswini Weereratne QC, Doughty Street Chambers

Speakers

Sarah Bedwell, Director of Regulation, Human Tissue Authority

Zoë Fleetwood, Dawson Cornwell

Christina Helden, Hempsons

Kate Beattie, Doughty Street Chambers

 

 


Event: Symposium on Law, Compassion, and Healthcare

20 February 2017

18 May 2017, 14:00—17:30hrs

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London

A symposium exploring compassion in relation to law and healthcare – through presentations and discussion, with speakers from academia, practice, and the judiciary.

Speakers

Sir Mark Hedley, former High Court judge; ruled in, inter alia, Portsmouth NHS Trust v. Wyatt.

Professor Hazel Biggs, Professor of Healthcare Law and Bioethics; co-Director of HEAL (the Centre for Health Ethics and Law), University of Southampton, Editor-in-Chief (Joint), Medical Law Review

Paul Bowen QC, Brick Court Chambers; author of Blackstone’s Guide to the Mental Health Act 2007

Dr. Paquita de Zulueta, Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, Imperial College; Member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Kate Rohde, Solicitor, Partner, Kingsley Napley

Dr. Phil Bielby, Law, University of Hull, author of Competence and Vulnerability in Biomedical Research

Dermot Feenan, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; Founder & Convenor, Law & Compassion Research Network

Chairs

Dr. Glenys Williams, Law, Aberystwyth University

Katy Peters, Law, University of Surrey

Registration fee £59.00 

Booking

Via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/symposium-on-law-compassion-and-healthcare-tickets-31853045316?aff=es2

Enquiries: Dermot Feenan, Academic Coordinator. dermot.feenan [at] sas.ac.uk

Organised by the Law & Compassion Research Network.


Seminar: religion, pluralism and medical ethics in paediatric intensive care

16 February 2017

May 8 2017, Jesus College Oxford 2pm-5pm, including refreshments

A child is critically ill in the intensive care unit. Doctors believe that the child’s prognosis is very poor and that treatment should be withdrawn. However, her parents do not agree. They say that it is contrary to their religion to stop treatment.

How often is religion a source of disagreement about treatment in intensive care? What are the views of major religions about withdrawing treatment in intensive care? 

Should religious requests for treatment be treated differently from secular requests? Should religious preferences for treatment count in a child? Should religious views be accommodated when providing scarce and expensive medical resources?

Guest Speaker: Prof John Paris S.J., Professor of Bioethics, Boston College

Speakers/ Panel Participants:

John Paris, Joe Brierley, Sarah Barclay, David Jones, John Wyatt, Siddiq Diwan, Dominic Wilkinson

This seminar is aimed at health professionals, ethicists, philosophers, theologians and chaplains. There are strictly limited places.

Early bird registration £15/10* if register by 28th February. £25/20* subsequently.

*Discounted registration for students.

To reserve a place at the seminar, please email rachel.gaminiratne [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk

Questions about the seminar should be directed to Professor Dominic Wilkinson, dominic.wilkinson [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk


Event: Towards a Rhetoric of Medical Law

19 January 2017

The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies is delighted to announce the launch of the IALS New Book Forum chaired by Professor Diamond Ashiagbor, IALS.  The first book under discussion is:

Title:  Towards a Rhetoric of Medical Law, Routledge, 2016

Author: Professor John Harrington, Cardiff University

Commentators: Professor Richard Ashcroft (QMUL); Dr Emilie Cloatre (Kent);  Professor Alan Finlayson (UEA)

Date and Time: 7 February 2017, 16.00-18.00

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

For further information and to book please go to the event page.


Seminar: Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation

22 November 2016

IALS Legal History Seminar

02 Dec 2016, 18:00 to 20:00
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Professor Mark Lunney, University of New England, Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation: Section 4 of the ‘Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1944’ (NSW)

This event is free but advance booking is requested.

Organised in association with the London Legal History seminar.


Seminars: The London Medico-Legal Society

17 November 2016

The London Medico-Legal Society meets monthly during the academic year for a lecture of interest followed by drinks and canapes. The meetings are held in the Medical Society of London building, a lovely old Georgian town house in Chandos Street W1.

We are keen to welcome new members, if you are interested in joining please do get in touch, you are very welcome to come to a couple of meetings before committing to join (the annual subscription is excellent value at £100 or £25 for students).

You will be very welcome; if you are planning to come to a meeting please contact us so that we can welcome you.

Dr Sarah Galbraith

Member of Council, London Medico-Legal Society

medicolegalgalbraith [at] gmail.com


Seminar: Current Legal Challenges for the NHS

10 November 2016

Date: Wednesday 23rd November 2016  6.00pm – 7.00pm, followed by a drinks reception

Venue: 39 Essex Chambers, 81 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1DD

Topics to be covered include:

  • NHS consultations – general principles
  • Public sector equality duty – potential pitfalls
  • Sustainability and Transformation Plans – the future of the NHS

RSVP TO peter.campbell [AT] 39essex.com


Seminar: Autonomy, ignorance and informed consent

10 November 2016

Arnon Keren (University of Haifa / King’s College London): Autonomy, ignorance and informed consent

 

5 December 2016, 16:00-17:30
King’s College London, Strand Campus, Somerset House East Wing, SW1.18 (Moot Court)

London Bioethics Colloquium 2016-17

All welcome, no need to register.

 


Seminar: Law (and the place of law) at the end of life

10 October 2016

Tuesday 1 November 2016 16.00-18.00

Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0RN

Sir Mark Hedley, former judge of the High Court of England and Wales, joins leading barristers Alex Ruck Keene (Visiting Research Fellow at KCL) and Eloise Power in a discussion about this complex and interesting topic.

To reserve a free place please contact legal.services.events [at] rcn.org.uk before Wednesday 26 October 2016.


Seminar: My Life, My Decision: A new approach to advance care planning

28 September 2016

Thursday October 20, 2016

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Church House Westminster, Deans Yard, London

A free seminar organised by Compassion in Dying:

My Life, My Decision was an ambitious, multifaceted programme of work delivered by Compassion in Dying and its partners, and funded by the Big Lottery’s Silver Dreams Fund to run from July 2014 until October 2016.

Its aim was to support people aged over 50 to think about and plan their care in advance, helping to ensure they have the death that is right for them.

The project tried and tested new ways of engaging people and communities in planning for the end of life. It developed a service that placed the individual at the centre of their care decisions and supported them to express and record their wishes in a legally binding way. It also developed effective models of partnership working between health services and voluntary organisations, maximising the capacity of healthcare professionals by providing support to their patients to plan their care.

More details and registration information available via Eventbrite.