PhD: ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice: Finance and Medicine’ at the University of Sheffield – Philosophy

19 January 2017

‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice: Finance and Medicine’ is a collaborative research project in applied epistemology and ethics between the University of Gröningen, the University of Sheffield and CUNY Graduate Center, sponsored by the Dutch Research Council (NWO) led by Profs Boudewijn de Bruin (Gröningen) and Miranda Fricker (CUNY Graduate Center/Sheffield).

This PhD studentship commences on 1 September 2017. The successful candidate will spend three years pursuing research for the Sheffield PhD in Philosophy, and they will be expected to visit Gröningen during their second year. They may also visit CUNY Graduate Center in New York, though there is not at present any extra funding for those purposes. After completion of the Sheffield PhD at the end of Year Three, they will spend Year Four in Gröningen pursuing research leading to a second PhD in Philosophy or in Economics from the University of Gröningen.

Supervision will be shared between Profs de Bruin and Fricker, with further supervisory support given by colleagues at Sheffield. Details of the overall project available on request from mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu

Requirements

The studentship is open to students of any nationality. Normally, candidates should have completed a minimum of two years’ full-time undergraduate study in Philosophy, and have gained a good 2.1 BA Honours Degree (67%) or equivalent (US GPA 3.6). Candidates should have completed a Master’s course (or equivalent) in Philosophy, with a substantial research component, achieving a grade equivalent to 67%. It is desirable that candidates also have some knowledge of Finance or Medicine.

Please see www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/info/englang for English Language requirements.

Application Process

Candidates should submit an application for the Sheffield PhD via www.sheffield.ac.uk/philosophy/prospectivepostgraduates/applying

using the heading ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice studentship’.

Applying for a studentship in this project does not preclude applicants from applying for other sources of funding for their PhD.

In their online research proposal (900-1000 words), candidates should make clear how their background and interests make them a suitable candidate for the Towards Professional Epistemic Justice project, and explain the specific lines of enquiry they would wish to pursue within the framework of the project and the branch of it (epistemic justice and finance/ medicine) in which they wish to situate their thesis. Candidates may propose any project they see as broadly fitting these themes. Topics covered might include the structure of virtue and/or vice, virtues of epistemic justice, individual and collective or institutional virtues and vices, procedural remedies for biased outcomes, overcoming implicit bias, self-trust, self-fulfilling testimonial injustice, recognition theory, broader issues of justice and injustice in medicine and/or finance etc.

Candidates must also send an email message to Professor Fricker, mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu notifying her that an application has been submitted and giving her the application number using ‘Towards Professional Epistemic Justice studentship’ in the subject line.

Interviews (probably by Skype or FaceTime) will be held in March 2017.

For further information, please contact Prof Miranda Fricker (mfricker [at] gc.cuny.edu) and/or Prof Boudewijn de Bruin (b.p.de.bruin [at] rug.nl).

Funding Details

The studentship is funded from 1/9/2107 to 31/7/2021 directly by the University of Gröningen. It pays €28,498 (Year 1), €33,201 (Year 2), €34,778 (Year 3) and €31,245 (Year 4 until 31/7/2021) and are subject to Dutch tax law. These funds are to pay course fees at Sheffield and to provide maintenance.

Location of PhD

University of Sheffield (3 years)

University of Groningen (1 year)


Job: Associate Professor in Health Law and Regulation at Melbourne Law School

19 January 2017

 

Location: Melbourne
Salary: AU$140,758 to AU$155,072
£84,482.95 to £93,074.21 converted salary* p.a. plus 17% superannuation
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Permanent
Placed on: 9th January 2017
Closes: 28th February 2017
Job Ref: 0042049

About Melbourne Law School
Melbourne Law School (MLS) is Australia’s first all-graduate law faculty. Melbourne Law School was the first faculty in Australia to teach law, and awarded this country’s first law degrees. MLS is ranked the Number 1 Law School in Australia and sits within the top 10 law schools in the world.

About the role:
The position is to take a leadership and management role in developing a successful programme of health law research and teaching alongside Professor Jane Kaye. The position has been established within the Law School but will work closely with the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and other relevant faculties and schools.

About you:
The successful incumbent will ideally be experienced in establishing collaborations and developing research projects with healthcare professionals working in innovative areas of translational research. In addition, they will be expected to contribute more generally to the work of the Melbourne Law School in teaching and learning, research, engagement and leadership and service. For the first five years of the appointment, they will teach one subject in either the Melbourne Juris Doctor (JD) programme or the Melbourne Law Masters (MLM) in medical and health law. After that time they may be required to take on a full teaching load.

Melbourne Law School is an equal opportunity employer, and welcomes applications from scholars able to enrich the diversity of our community. In particular, we encourage Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

Employment Type: Full-time continuing position

Enquiries only to: Professor Jane Kaye, Email jane.kaye [at] law.ox.ac.uk

Close date: 28 Feb 2017

For position information and to apply online go to: http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers, click on the relevant option (‘Current Staff’ or ‘Prospective Staff’)  and search under the job title or job number 0042049.


Event: Towards a Rhetoric of Medical Law

19 January 2017

The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies is delighted to announce the launch of the IALS New Book Forum chaired by Professor Diamond Ashiagbor, IALS.  The first book under discussion is:

Title:  Towards a Rhetoric of Medical Law, Routledge, 2016

Author: Professor John Harrington, Cardiff University

Commentators: Professor Richard Ashcroft (QMUL); Dr Emilie Cloatre (Kent);  Professor Alan Finlayson (UEA)

Date and Time: 7 February 2017, 16.00-18.00

Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

For further information and to book please go to the event page.


Lecture: Has Montgomery Administered the Last Rites to Therapeutic Privilege? A Diagnosis and a Prognosis

12 January 2017

UCL Current Legal Problems Series

Professor Rachael Mulheron (Queen Mary University of London)

Thursday 19 January 2017, 18:00-19:00

UCL Pavilion (Main Quad), Gower Street, London WC1H 6BT

This lecture will outline those limited circumstances in which therapeutic privilege has actually worked in English jurisprudence to date, as well as the impact of Montgomery on the operation of the defence will be analysed. This lecture will also challenge the English judiciary either to adopt some workable version of the defence or to expressly abolish it altogether.

To read more about this lecture and register your attendance click here


Workshop: Suffering and Autonomy at End of Life

6 January 2017

University of Glasgow, March 2017 (date to be confirmed)

We are pleased to announce a series of events, to be held in Glasgow in 2017-2018, discussing the relationship between suffering and autonomy, with a particular focus on end of life care.

In each event, one space is reserved for a graduate student or early career researcher to present a paper which addresses the theme of the workshop. To that end we invite submissions from interested parties, addressing the themes of the series (as detailed below). We will pay all accommodation and subsistence costs, and also reasonable travel costs within the UK.

Demographic changes in western liberal democracies challenge established theory and practice concerning end of life care. This requires advances not only in the medical science of geriatric and palliative care, but also in the underlying philosophies of old age, illness, and dying, and how they relate to autonomy. Autonomy is an ideal according to which people successfully shape their lives in accordance with the values they have chosen. Autonomy at the end of life is a crucial dimension of this ideal.  Answers to the urgent questions concerning the design and delivery of end of life care require a deeper understanding of, for example, the nature and role of the suffering including its effects on consent, well-being, decision-making, the integrity of a person, and their quality of life.

The first event will be a one-day workshop, to be held in March 2017, and will answer the question: how does suffering augment autonomy at end of life?

Physical and emotional suffering can have significant value. For instance, a person’s perspective on what’s valuable or important may be enhanced through their suffering and their understanding about who they are and what they care about may be advanced. Suffering at the end of life plausibly often yields just such enhancements and advancements, therefore providing distinctive opportunities for the augmentation of autonomy. At this workshop, we thus consider how suffering augments autonomy at the end of life.

Further details (including dates and registration details) will be announced soon.

For the first workshop, full papers of up to 6,000 words should be submitted to ben.colburn[at]glasgow.ac.uk by 1 February 2017, with a separate note indicating the applicant’s career status.* The successful presenter will be informed by 1 March 2017.


Conference:Mechanisms in medicine

6 January 2017

July 3-5 2017, Centre for Reasoning, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/jonw/mechanisms-in-medicine/

Keynote speakers
Raffaela Campaner (University of Bologna)
Daniel Commenges (Bordeaux Population Health Research Center)
Jeremy Howick (Oxford University)
Stathis Psillos (University of Athens)
Daniel Steel (The University of British Columbia)
Kurt Straif (International Agency for Research on Cancer)
John Worrall (LSE)

Background
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a relatively recent technique for supporting clinical decisions by the current best evidence. While it is uncontroversial that we should use the current best evidence in clinical decision making, it is highly controversial what the best evidence is. EBM considers evidence from clinical trials, in particular, randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of those trials to be the best evidence. On the other hand, evidence of mechanisms that is obtained by means other than clinical trials is considered to be of low quality.

However, there is a growing body of literature that highlights the many benefits of considering evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence from clinical trials. For instance, evidence of mechanisms is crucial for interpreting clinical trials, establishing a causal claim, and extrapolating from the trial population to the treatment population.
This conference seeks to explore whether and in which ways evidence of mechanism may improve medical decision making. The conference will bring together philosophers and medical researchers.

Call for papers
Please submit an abstract of up to 500 words on or before 1st February 2017 via email to c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk. The final decision on submissions will be made by 1st March.  A special session will be dedicated to contributions submitted by PhD candidates.

Contributions should address questions such as the following:
– How can we get evidence of mechanisms in medicine?
– How can evidence of mechanisms best be considered alongside evidence of correlation to evaluate causal claims in medical research and health policy?
– How can quality of evidence of mechanisms be characterised?
– Which accounts of causality best fit the programme for integrating evidence of mechanisms with evidence of correlation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms be employed in extrapolation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms inform statistical and graphical models in medicine?

Registration
Registration is free but compulsory. There are a limited number of places so please register early. Please register via email toc.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk

Organisation  
This conference is organised by Christian Wallmann on behalf of the Centre for Reasoning at the University of Kent and the EBM+ consortium. It is an activity of the project Evaluating evidence in medicine, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.
For any queries please contact Christian Wallmann: c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk


Working Party update: Genome editing

6 January 2017

Nuffield Council on Bioethics UPDATE Genome Editing

Following the online publication of Genome editing: an ethical review in late September, the newly established Working Party on genome editing and human reproduction is currently conducting further evidence gathering. The Working Party will develop practical ethical guidance concerning the application of genome editing in humans and is expected to publish its recommendations in mid-2017.

Further information on this project is available on the Council’s website.

If you would like to receive a hard copy of the recently published review or the short guide, or have any questions with regard to our work in this area, please email genedit@nuffieldbioethics.org or Bettina Schmietow at bschmietow@nuffieldbioethics.org.