Conference: Health Law and the UK: Where Now After Brexit?

6 December 2016
Thursday 4th May 2017
Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham

As policy  makers and lawyers grapple with the aftermath of the EU Referendum this conference explores the  implications and  challenges of Brexit for UK Health Law.  Papers will include ‘Brexit: an opportunity to rationalise bioethics governance in the U.K.?; the impact of Brexit for  public health law; “Clinical Trials in the UK: Where Now After Brexit”;  the implications of Brexit for reproductive choice; “Open for Business – Risks to Public Health from International Commerce After Brexit”; “Research Regulation: A leap in the Dark”; privacy health and data protection post Brexit; and “Pharmaceutical regulation: another fine mess they’ve got us into”.

Speakers include:

Professor Emma Cave, Durham Law School

Professor John Coggon, Bristol Law School

Dr Mairead Enright, Birmingham Law School

Professor Graeme Laurie, University of Edinburgh

Dr Samantha Halliday, Leeds Law School

Professor Tamara Hervey, Sheffield Law Schools

Dr Mark Flear, Queens University Belfast Law School

Professor Jean McHale, Centre for Health Law Science and Policy, Birmingham Law School

Professor Jonathan Montgomery, Faculty of Laws UCL

Professor Chris Newdick,  School of Law, University of Reading

Professor Keith Syrett, Cardiff Law School

Dr Mark Taylor, Sheffield Law School

Full registration details regarding the conference will be released in January 2017

For further information contact Jean McHale – j.v.mchale [at] bham.ac.uk


Job: Associate Professor in Health Law and Regulation at Melbourne Law School

5 December 2016

Salary: AU$140,758 to AU$155,072 = £82,667.17 to £91,073.79
Applications Due: 11th December 2016

Melbourne Law School (MLS) is Australia’s first all-graduate law faculty. Melbourne Law School was the first faculty in Australia to teach law, and awarded this country’s first law degrees. MLS is ranked the Number 1 Law School in Australia and sits within the top 10 law schools in the world.

The position is to take a leadership and management role in developing a successful programme of health law research and teaching alongside Professor Jane Kaye. The position has been established within the Law School but will work closely with the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences and other relevant faculties and schools.

The successful incumbent will ideally be experienced in establishing collaborations and developing research projects with healthcare professionals working in innovative areas of translational research. In addition, they will be expected to contribute more generally to the work of the Melbourne Law School in teaching and learning, research, engagement and leadership and service. For the first five years of the appointment, they will teach one subject in either the Melbourne Juris Doctor (JD) programme or the Melbourne Law Masters (MLM) in medical and health law. After that time they may be required to take on a full teaching load.

Melbourne Law School is an equal opportunity employer, and welcomes applications from scholars able to enrich the diversity of our community. In particular, we encourage Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to apply.

 


Job: Lecturer in Biolaw at Durham

5 December 2016

Durham University – Durham Law School

Salary: £32,004 to £46,924

Applications Due: 29 January 2017 23.30

Durham Law School is seeking to appoint an outstanding candidate at Lecturer (Assistant Professor) level. We welcome applications from exceptional scholars with research interests in the field of biolaw. This area is understood broadly to encompass legal and interdisciplinary research in any aspect of health or the biosciences, including environmental law.

This post offers an exciting opportunity to make a major contribution to the development of the Law School’s research and teaching. We are keen to invite applications from individuals at any stage of their academic career. Candidates in the early stages of their career should have a completed doctorate (or have a doctorate under examination) and be able to demonstrate the capacity for international-level research achievement. We would expect candidates to have at least one significant published/completed piece suitable for submission to REF 2021. More experienced candidates will be expected to have a more significant publication record. The specifications for the post are linked to the intention to make a close-to-comprehensive REF2021 submission.

Presentations are anticipated to take place on the morning of Monday 27 March 2017 and interviews on the following day. We expect to contact applicants two weeks before the presentation date.


Lecture: Mary Donnelly on Rebalancing Empowerment and Protection: Evolving Legal Frameworks for Impaired Capacity

28 November 2016

Thursday 8 December 2016, 18:00 – 19:00

UCL Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

Current Legal Problems series

Speaker: Professor Mary Donnelly (University College Cork)
Chair: TBC
Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA and BSB

Admission: Free, Registration required (here)

The past decade has seen a notable evolution in the normative context for law’s response to people with impaired capacity. Driven by a range of factors, including greater recognition of human rights (perhaps most notably through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities) and better empirical understandings, a rhetoric of inclusion and empowerment has replaced traditional approaches centred on control and protection.  Law reform projects in various jurisdictions (Australia, Canada, Ireland, Northern Ireland) have attempted to develop legislative frameworks to give effect to these emerging norms. Yet there is also another narrative. Concerns are expressed (perhaps most commonly by frontline professionals: healthcare professionals, lawyers, social workers and sometimes by family members of people with impaired capacity) that something important may be lost where there is a devaluation of protective norms. There is also a dissonance between the abstract ideals of human rights on the one hand and on the other, the complex corporeal, economic, family, phenomenological and social context within which people with impaired capacity, and those who care for/about them, live.

Tensions between empowerment and protection norms and between abstract, rights-based and contextual, evidence-based policy drivers are inevitable by-products of law’s evolution and they play a necessary role in the development of the law in this area. Rebalancing is a process and not a once-off event. And, of course, as revealed by even a minimal consideration of earlier legal responses to impaired capacity, there is a good deal of room for evolutionary wrong-turns and for unexpected and undesirable consequences. Placing current debates about how law should respond to impaired capacity within an evolutionary context, this paper identifies and evaluates the range of ways in which contemporary tensions may be resolved.

About the speaker:

Mary Donnelly is a Professor in the Law School, University College Cork. Her books include Consent: Bridging the Gap Between Doctor and Patient (Cork: Cork University Press, 2002); Healthcare Decision-Making and the Law: Autonomy, Capacity and the Limits of Liberalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010) and The Law of Credit and Security (Dublin: Round Hall Thomson Reuters, 2011; 2nd ed, 2015) and she is co-author of End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law (Cork University Press, 2011) and Consumer Law: Rights and Regulation (Dublin: Round Hall Thomson Reuters, 2014) and co-editor of Ethical and Legal Debates in Irish Healthcare: Confronting Complexities (Manchester University Press, 2016).

She has collaborated on projects funded by the European Commission, the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences, the National Children’s Office and the Irish Hospice Foundation and has acted as consultant for public agencies and legal firms.  She is/has been a member of the Expert Group to review the Mental Health Act 2001 and of the HSE National Consent Advisory Group and the HSE National Assisted Decision Making Steering Group.


Conference: RETHINKING THE ETHICS OF EMBRYO RESEARCH: GENOME EDITING, 14 DAYS AND BEYOND

22 November 2016

Progress Educational Trust public conference

Wednesday 7 December 2016, 9.30am5pm

Speakers include PROFESSOR MAGDALENA ZERNICKA-GOETZ from the University of Cambridge (leader of recent research in which human embryos were cultured in vitro for 13 days, the longest time ever achieved), DR KATHY NIAKAN from the Francis Crick Institute (the first researcher licensed by the UK regulator to use genome editing in human embryo research), and LORD GEORGE CAREY from the House of Lords (former Archbishop of Canterbury).

There will also be Keynote Addresses by BARONESS MARY WARNOCK (who originally proposed the 14-day limit on human embryo research, and whose Warnock Report is arguably the world’s most influential analysis of the ethics of assisted reproduction and embryo research) and PROFESSOR SIR IAN WILMUT (creator of Dolly the sheep, the first mammal ever cloned from an adult cell).

Other confirmed speakers and chairs include:

DR SIMON FISHEL (Founder and President of CARE Fertility, and one of the first researchers to demonstrate that embryos are capable of responding to their environment)

PROFESSOR BRUCE WHITELAW (Deputy Director of the Roslin Institute, and pioneer in research involving transgenic and genome-edited animals)

SALLY CHESHIRE (Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority)

PROFESSOR ALISON MURDOCH (Former Director of the Newcastle Fertility Centre, and leader of the first research in which an early embryo was created from a human nuclear transfer procedure)

PROFESSOR DAVID JONES (Director of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre)

PROFESSOR SARAH FRANKLIN (Director of the University of Cambridge‘s Reproductive Sociology Research Group)

PROFESSOR STEPHEN WILKINSON (bioethicist and author of the book Choosing Tomorrow’s Children: The Ethics Of Selective Reproduction)

DR ROGER HIGHFIELD (Director of External Affairs at the Science Museum Group)

FIONA FOX (Chair of the Progress Educational Trust and Chief Executive of the Science Media Centre)

SARAH NORCROSS (Director of the Progress Educational Trust)

Conference sessions include:

• ‘THE WARNOCK REPORT AND THE 14 DAY RULE

• ‘THE 14 DAY RULE: CALLING TIME ON EMBRYO RESEARCH

• ‘GENOME EDITING: CRISPR AT THE CUTTING EDGE

• ‘WHAT’S SO SPECIAL ABOUT THE STATUS OF THE EMBRYO?


Seminar: Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation

22 November 2016

IALS Legal History Seminar

02 Dec 2016, 18:00 to 20:00
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Professor Mark Lunney, University of New England, Nervous Shock and the Chameleon Nature of English Judicial Decisions in Australian Legislation: Section 4 of the ‘Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1944’ (NSW)

This event is free but advance booking is requested.

Organised in association with the London Legal History seminar.


Seminars: The London Medico-Legal Society

17 November 2016

The London Medico-Legal Society meets monthly during the academic year for a lecture of interest followed by drinks and canapes. The meetings are held in the Medical Society of London building, a lovely old Georgian town house in Chandos Street W1.

We are keen to welcome new members, if you are interested in joining please do get in touch, you are very welcome to come to a couple of meetings before committing to join (the annual subscription is excellent value at £100 or £25 for students).

You will be very welcome; if you are planning to come to a meeting please contact us so that we can welcome you.

Dr Sarah Galbraith

Member of Council, London Medico-Legal Society

medicolegalgalbraith [at] gmail.com