Job: Post-doctoral research fellow in the Laws of Social Reproduction at KCL

18 December 2018

Research Associate, Laws of Social Reproduction

King’s College London – The Dickson Poon School of Law

Location: London
Salary: £37,412
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Fixed-Term/Contract
Placed On: 11th December 2018
Closes: 13th January 2019
Job Ref: R6/FFL/2517/18-RN
 The salary will be paid at Grade 6, £37,412 per annum, inclusive of £3,223 per annum London Allowance.

This is an exciting opportunity to work on a large-scale European Research Council funded project titled ‘Laws of Social Reproduction’. The project undertakes a comparison of the law’s regulation of five sectors of women’s labour including sex work, erotic dancing, commercial surrogacy, paid domestic work and unpaid domestic work.

The post-doctoral research associate (PDRA)’s main responsibilities are to conduct literature review across relevant disciplines, conduct qualitative research in India, analyse the field work data using suitable software, organise a major national level workshop involving numerous stakeholders including academics, activists and policy-makers, publish academic outputs and disseminate the research findings of the project.

Prior field work experience in India essential; field work experience in at least one of the five sectors of reproductive labour listed above is highly desirable. Proven research skills essential. Applications from doctoral and post-doctoral candidates in law, anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, medical ethics and feminist economics are welcome.

The selection process will include a panel interview and a presentation.

For an informal discussion to find out more about the role please contact: Professor Prabha Kotiswaran, Prabha.kotiswaran [AT] kcl.ac.uk

To apply, please register with the King’s College London application portal and complete your application online. When applying, in the ‘Upload supporting documents’ section, please attach a personal statement to tell us why you are suitable for the role.

Please enclose writing sample relevant to the themes of the research project.


Play: Bodies by Vivienne Franzmann

20 February 2017

 

“We should have brought a gift.”

“We’ve brought a gift. It’s called 22 thousand pounds.”

Purchased from Russia. Developed in India. Delivered to the UK.

A global transaction over nine months that offers ‘a lifetime of happiness’ to all involved.

“What do you think will happen to a baby girl in India that nobody wants?”

Vivienne Franzmann’s previous work at the Royal Court includes Pests and The Witness. Her new play Bodies will be directed by Jude Christian (Lela & Co.).

Wed 5 Jul – Sat 12 Aug

Jerwood Theatre Upstairs, Royal Court Theatre

Tickets from £12. General booking opens on Wed 22 Feb at 10am.


Radio: Controlling people

17 October 2011

BBC World Service, available indefinitely as a podcast or listen online via the iPlayer

From the programme’s website: “The world’s population is due to reach seven billion people this year, and by around 2050 it could grow by yet another two billion.

Using India as an exemplar, Professor Matthew Connelly of Columbia University, New York, documents a global campaign that began with the best humanitarian ideals, but which led to authoritarian control over some of the world’s poorest citizens.

He uncovers a story of tragic mistakes and sometimes terrible human rights abuses, and shows how we will be living with the consequences for decades to come.”


Radio: BBC World Service ‘Womb for Rent’

1 August 2011

BBC World Service, broadcast in July but available to listen online and as a podcast

An interesting documentary on surrogacy in India including extensive interviews with an Irish commissioning mother and her Indian gestational surrogate. A BBC news article includes links to the stream and the podcast.


TV: surrogacy

31 May 2011

True Stories: Google Baby

More4, 31 May 2011, 10.00-11.45pm, available after broadcast on 4oD

From the programme’s website: “An Israeli entrepreneur is proposing a new service: pregnancy producing. His customers can select sperm and eggs online, with surrogacy outsourced to India. But what are the ethical and moral implications?”

From the Radio Times: “We open with the least romantic birth scene you’ll see this year. In India, a woman lies impassively as a C-section is carried out; while stitching the patient up, one of the doctors is on the phone, organising another birth. The woman is a surrogate and the room is part of a baby farm, full of women who bear children for a living. Elsewhere in this drab, disturbingly matter-of-fact film, we meet a man who conducts his international surrogacy business using Skype, a never-quiet mobile and a suitcase just big enough to hold a nitrogen flask of frozen embryos. Then there’s the American egg donor, injecting herself with potentially carcinogenic fertility drugs. The miracle of life suddenly seems very creepy.”


Debates: Battle of Ideas medical ethics strand

7 October 2010

Battle for Medical Ethics
Battle of Ideas 2010, Royal College of Art, London
October 30 and 31, 2010

“The success of modern scientific medicine in prolonging our lives has thrown up a number of new dilemmas. As people live longer, medicine faces new challenges from ageing-related diseases: can we afford to treat these conditions in ever more people, and who should decide? Is it up to us to guarantee our own quality of life in old age by living healthily all our lives? And if so, should patients have more say over treatments, rather than old-fashioned medical authorities? Should we be free to choose alternative therapies, or should the medical profession reassert the primacy of scientific medicine?”

Saturday 30 October 2010

10.30am to 12.00pm Lecture Theatre 1
Ageing and medicine: quality versus quantity?

12.15pm to 1.15pm Lecture Theatre 1
Alternative medicine: the pros and cons

1.30pm to 3.00pm Lecture Theatre 1
Rationing and medicine: what price life? (featuring John Harris,
Lord Alliance Professor of Bioethics, University of Manchester; joint editor-in-chief The Journal of Medical Ethics; member, Human Genetics Commission)

3.30pm to 5.00pm Lecture Theatre 1
Patient centred healthcare: the right to choose?

5.15pm to 6.30pm Lecture Theatre 1
Debating Matters International Final: Organ Donation – UK versus India