Job: Teaching Fellow in Medical Ethics

7 August 2017
The main purpose of the Teaching Fellow position is to contribute to the delivery of modules on the MA in Medical Ethics and Law and MSc in Mental Health, Ethics and Law at King’s College London. This role particularly involves expertise in mental health ethics. 

The position is within the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, Dickson Poon School of Law.  The Centre was the first of its kind in the United Kingdom and is an international leader in research and teaching within the field. 

The salary will be paid at Grade 6, £32,958- £39,324 per annum, plus £2,623 per annum London Allowance. 

This post is a full-time, fixed term contract for 6 months, to start at the beginning of January 2018.

Interviews will be in the week commencing: 4/09/2017.

Closing date for applications: 27th August 2017 
 
Job pack including person specification and application process: 

https://www.hirewire.co.uk/HE/1061247/MS_JobDetails.aspx?JobID=77664

Inquires to: jillian.craigie@kcl.ac.uk


The Centre

The Centre of Medical Law and Ethics in the Dickson Poon School of Law was the first centre of its kind in the United Kingdom and is an international leader in research and teaching within the field. It runs a long-standing and highly acclaimed MA in Medical Ethics and Law, and jointly with the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience the centre also now offers an MSc in Mental Health, Ethics and Law.

Members of the centre have a record of attracting competitive research grants and making an impact on policy debate and development, regulation and clinical practice through their research. With colleagues in the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, centre members have recently secured a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award on Mental Health and Justice. This collaboration across a number institutions is generating a vibrant research community, and the Teaching Fellow will have the opportunity engage with its activities.

The Programmes

The Medical Ethics and Law MA is designed for medical and legal professionals as well as graduates from any relevant discipline, and involves the study of ethical and legal questions raised by medical practice and science.

Further information is available here:
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-ethics-and-law-ma.aspx

The Mental Health, Ethics and Law MSc is a strongly interdisciplinary programme designed to investigate the interface between mental health, ethics and law at a theoretical level, and to engage directly with the dilemmas and experience of illness encountered in practice. The programme aims to develop the skills necessary to analyse and critique law, practice and policy in relation to mental health, equipping graduates to become leaders in healthcare, mental health law or policy.

Further information is available here: 
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/mental-health-ethics-and-law-msc.aspx

Please see the links below for supporting information about the School and Centre:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/index.aspx
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tinhErtIj_0
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/research/centres/medlawethics/index.aspx
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Job: Post-doc in Mental Health & Justice

27 July 2017

York Law School, in collaboration with King’s College London. 

Full-time position, 2.2 years.

Closing date for applications: 25th August 2017.

We wish to appoint a fixed-term full-time Post-Doctoral Research Associate to work on the ‘Enabling legal capacity through decision making support’ work stream within the ‘Mental Health and Justice’ Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award project.  Based in York Law School, you will work with Matt Matravers and Jillian Craigie (King’s College, London) on moral and legal questions that surround the idea that respecting persons means respecting their (expressed) preferences in light of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability.

Further details and candidate brief here.


Conference: European Understandings of Advance Decision-Making

14 July 2017

12th September, 2017, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

This interdisciplinary conference marks the culmination of the ESRC research seminar series ‘Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’.

Registration

Registration for the conference is free, but compulsory. Numbers are limited and early registration is highly recommended. Please register via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/understandings-of-advance-decision-making-an-interdisciplinary-conference-tickets-33922111950. Bursaries will be available to fund travel and accommodation costs for PhD students – please email S.Halliday[at]leeds.ac.uk if you wish to apply for financial support. The conference is aimed at both academic and professional attendees.

Keynote speakers

Professor John Ellershaw (Professor of Palliative Medicine, University of Liverpool)
Professor Rob Heywood (Professor of Medical Law, University of East Anglia).

Speakers

Dr Louise Bramley, University of Nottingham: Negotiating care services with frailty: Implications for decision making and advance care panning.  Abstract

Astrid Gieselmann & Professor Jochen Vollmann, Ruhr Universität Bochum: How should advance directives be implemented in psychiatry? Clinicians’ attitudes toward different types of advance directives in psychiatric treatment in Germany.  Abstract

Dr Samantha Halliday, University of Leeds, & Professor Jean McHale, University of Birmingham: Basic care, advance decisions and the Burke effect. Abstract

Dr Ruth Horn: “Why should I question a patient’s wish?” A comparative study on physicians’ perspectives on their duties to respect advance directives.  Abstract

Gillian Loomes, University of York: Cripping the Crystal Ball: Exploring the Synergies and Tensions when Advance Care Planning and Disability Politics Meet.  Abstract

Dr Alicia Perez Blanco, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid: Can advance care planning enhance decision-making at end-of-life in the Intensive Care Unit?  Abstract

Kevin De Sabbata, University of Leeds, Advance Directives, Dementia and the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: A new role for anticipated will.  Abstract

Professor Jo Samanta, De Montfort University: Advance decisions and Welfare LPAs: belt and braces for advance care planning?  Abstract

Dr Lucy Stephenson, Kings’ College London: Provision for Self-Binding Advance Directives Should be Included in Mental Health Act Reform.  Abstract

The conference is generously funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC).

Organisation

This conference is part of the research seminar series ‘Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’ funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. It is being organised by the grant holders, Dr Samantha Halliday, Prof. Jörg Richter and Prof Gillian Hundt.

Further information here.

 


Call for abstracts: European Understandings of Advance Decision-making

26 May 2017

12th September 2017 University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

www.eadm.leeds.ac.uk

Keynote speakers

Professor John Ellershaw (Professor of Palliative Medicine, University of Liverpool)

Professor Rob Heywood (Professor of Medical Law, University of East Anglia).

Background

This interdisciplinary conference marks the culmination of the ESRC research seminar series ‘Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’.

Advance medical decision-making occurs in a range of situations, encompassing decisions relating to end-of-life treatment, typically focussed upon refusals of life-sustaining treatment; advance decisions concerning physical health care unrelated to end of life care, including for example birth plans which typically include positive requests for treatments (e.g. an epidural) as well as refusals of treatment; and ADs relating to psychiatric treatment, where individuals with severe mental illness set out their treatment preferences. In each of these situations an advance decision can act as an important mechanism for conveying precedent autonomy, bridging the occurrence of incapacity and providing a clear statement of how the patient wants to be treated, or more usually what treatment the patient does not wish to be given.  Anticipatory decision-making offers great promise and could make a substantial contribution to the empowerment of those lacking capacity, but there are important asymmetries between anticipatory and contemporaneous decision-making that could potentially undermine both the legal and moral authority of an advance decision. The Council of Europe’s Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (1997) requires that account is taken of a patient’s previously expressed wishes (Article 9), demanding at least a minimal consideration of precedent autonomy. A number of European jurisdictions have gone further, seeking to clarify the standing of advance decisions and to promote legal certainty by providing statutory recognition of the importance and binding nature of at least some advance decisions.

The conference will consider European legislative responses to anticipatory decision-making, seeking to explore those responses within the practical contexts within which advance decision-making occurs.  We are particularly interested in linking legal discourse with policy and practice discourses and the (dis)connect between law, practice and professional guidance.

The conference is generously funded by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC).

 

Organisation 

This conference is part of the research seminar series’ Towards a European understanding of advance decision-making: a comparative, interdisciplinary approach’ funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.  It is being organised by the grant holders, Dr Samantha Halliday, Prof. Jörg Richter and Prof Gillian Hundt.

 

Submissions

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to S.Halliday[at]leeds.ac.uk by 15th June 2017.  Applicants should expect to hear from the convenors by 20th June 2017.

 

Registration

Registration for the conference is free, but compulsory. Numbers are limited and early registration is highly recommended. Please register via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/understandings-of-advance-decision-making-an-interdisciplinary-conference-tickets-33922111950. Bursaries will be available to fund travel and accommodation costs for PhD students – please email S.Halliday[at]leeds.ac.uk if you wish to apply for financial support.  The conference is aimed at both academic and professional attendees and will be CPD accredited.


Workshop: Sex selection – Changes in Australian policy

22 May 2017

9 June, 2017, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Macquarie University Research Centre for Agency, Values, and Ethics (CAVE) and Sydney University Centre for Values, Ethics, and Law in Medicine (VELiM) are hosting a workshop on the latest policy about sex selection in Australia on 9 June. All are welcome to attend but please register for catering purposes.

Speakers:

*   Dr Tereza Hendl (University of Sydney, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine)
*   Prof Wendy Rogers (Macquarie University, Department of Philosophy)
*   Dr Sascha Callaghan (University of Sydney, Sydney Law School)
*   Dr Kate Gleeson (Macquarie University, Macquarie Law School)
*   Morgan Carpenter (Organisation Intersex International Australia)
*   Dr Tamara Browne (Deakin University, School of Medicine)

Preliminary Program:

10:00 – 10:10: Tereza Hendl and Wendy Rogers, Opening Remarks

10:10 – 10:30: Wendy Rogers, “What’s changed on sex selection since 2007 Guidelines”

10:30 – 11:15: Sascha Callaghan, “Sex selection and the law”

11:15 – 11:45: Morning tea

11:45 – 12:30: Tereza Hendl, “2017 Guidelines, sex selection and gender equity”

12:30 – 13:15: Kate Gleeson, “Sex selection using IVF and abortion from feminist legal perspectives”

13:15 – 14:00: Lunch

14:00 – 14:45: Morgan Carpenter, “Prenatal genetic diagnosis and its implications for children with intersex variations”

14:45 – 15:00: Tamara Browne, “Is gender disappointment a mental disorder?”

16:00 – 16:30: Panel discussion

Contact: All are welcome but please register with Tereza Hendl tereza.hendl[at]sydney.edu.au

For information about other events, please visit: mq.edu.au/cave/events


Workshop: Does Dignity Help in Thinking about Paternalism?’

15 May 2017

Monday 29th May 2017, Edinburgh.

Every year during the Spring term the Edinburgh Legal Theory Research Group holds the Legal Theory Spring Festival (also known as Spring Workshops), which is composed by a series of thematic workshops organised by staff and students of the University of Edinburgh.

The 2017 Legal Theory Festival is scheduled for May 29th-June 1st, 2017. The festival is open to all and attendance is free – but places are limited and registration is required.

Full details about the Festival can be found here.

The workshops include the following:

Monday 29th May 2017:  Barbara Levenbook (NCSU) – ‘Does Dignity Help in Thinking about Paternalism?’
Venue: Old College, Elder Room 3:30pm – 5:30pm

Register via Eventbrite here.


Writing competition: Do the right thing

6 May 2017

British Medical Association Writing Competition

Submission deadline: Friday 7 July 2017

Do the right thing? Why wouldn’t you? Of course, just like you always tell the absolute truth, and hand in that pound coin you found to the police station.

Perhaps you have faced a dilemma where both options had a claim to be ‘right’? Or where neither felt right. Or where the ‘right thing’ – morally, legally or professionally – may have done more harm than good.

Another way to approach the topic is like this – if you failed to do the ‘right thing’, why? Lack of time, resources, insight, courage?

 

Open to BMA members only. Read the 2016 winning stories or details on terms and conditions and how to enter, here.