Call for papers: medical law section at the Society of Legal Scholars conference

18 February 2013

Call for Papers on Medical Law for the 2013 SLS Conference at University of Edinburgh

Deadline for abstracts – Monday 11  March 2013

Proposals are invited for papers for the medical law subject section meeting at the 2013 Annual SLS Conference which will take place from 3rd -6th September 2013 at the University of Edinburgh.  The Medical Law Section is in Group B and will therefore comprise two slots on Thursday 5th September and two slots on Friday 6th September. We anticipate that each slot will host two papers followed by discussion (8 papers in total), but we are very happy to consider alternatives such as panel sessions.

The overall theme of the Conference is “”Britain in Europe: Europe in Britain””, but we are happy to see proposals for papers that do not directly address the theme. All colleagues, whether practitioners, research students, early career academics or more senior colleagues, are invited to offer papers. If you are interested in presenting a paper, please e-mail us atslsmedicallaw [at] gmail.com with a title and a brief abstract. We are happy to discuss any potential submissions informally, so please get in touch. If you are proposing a paper for another section, we’d be grateful if you could let us know. There is no bar on giving more than one paper although it is useful for planning purposes and co-ordinating with other convenors to have a heads-up on this.

Finally, may we draw your attention to the competition for the prize for the best paper presented at the conference: those wishing to enter the competition must submit papers to the paper bank by 5pm on Monday 26 August 2013.

Please note that, as is the case each year, speakers have to book and pay to attend the conference.

Drs Amel Alghrani and Ruth Stirton
Convenors, Medical Law Section
Society of Legal Scholars

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Call for papers: end of life decision-making at Hamline University

22 February 2012

Call For Papers and Presenters
Honoring Patients’ Treatment Choices at the End of Life: New Tools, New Challenges, New Limits

Hamline University School of Law, Saint Paul, MN, November 8-9, 2012

The Health Law Institute at Hamline University and the Hamline Law Review seek proposals for presentations and papers for our all-day fall CLE/CEU Symposium on Friday, November 9, 2012. Our Symposium will examine the problems and solutions to issues currently arising at the intersection of medical law and end-of-life care.

TOPICS: Potential topics include, but are not limited to:
– Legal and medical issues concerning the use of POLST orders, especially in Minnesota;
– Institutional and community responses to medical futility disputes;
– Legal issues involved in end-of-life planning, including advance directives, health care proxies, DNR orders, living wills and the initiation and cessation of artificial support systems (such as artificial nutrition and hydration);
– A view of the decision-making process in end-of-life cases from the perspective of the parent, the family and the medical provider;
– Decision-making for the “unbefriended” patients without surrogates;
– Role of lawyers, guardians ad-litem and the courts in end-of-life cases;
– Applicable legal and medical standards in end-of-life cases;
– Ethical issues related to the roles of attorneys, medical providers and family members in end-of-life decision-making; and
– Any other related topics.

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Anyone interested in speaking at the Symposium and/or publishing in the Hamline Law Review’s Symposium issue should submit both a CV and a 500-word abstract to: healthlawsym2012 [at] hamline.edu by March 30th, 2012.

A committee will review the abstracts and will invite applicants to speak at the symposium and/or publish in the Hamline Law Review. The committee will base invitations on the relevancy, quality and originality of the abstract. Potential symposium speakers include both scholars and practitioners in law, medicine, and other disciplines. Symposium contributors will be provided with both travel and accommodation expenses, as well as a modest stipend.

FURTHER INFORMATION: For questions, please contact Hamline Health Law Institute Director and Law Professor Thaddeus Pope attpope01 [at] hamline.edu


Call for papers: Criminalising Contagion

10 February 2012

Criminalizing Contagion: ethical, legal and clinical challenges of prosecuting the spread of disease and sexually transmitted infections

The BMJ Group journals Sexually Transmitted Infections (impact factor 3.029) and the Journal of Medical Ethics (impact factor 1.391), in conjunction with academics at the Centre for Social Ethics and Policy (University of Manchester) and the Health Ethics and Law Network (University of Southampton), would like to publish a collection of articles on the criminalization of disease and sexually transmitted infections. We invite article contributions to be published as part of this themed collection.

Themes

The use of criminal law to respond to infectious disease transmission has far-reaching implications for law, policy and practice. It presupposes co-operation between clinicians and criminal justice professionals, and that people who infect others can be effectively and fairly identified and brought to justice. There is a potentially difficult relationship between criminal justice and public health bodies, whose priorities do not necessarily coincide. We are interested in receiving papers of broad interest to an international readership of medical ethics scholars and practicing clinicians on any of the following topics:

• Legislative and policy reform on disease and sexually transmitted infections
• Health services and the police: privacy, state interference and human rights
• Evidence and ethics: prosecuting ‘infectious’ personal behaviours
• Clinicians and the courts: the role of health professionals and criminal justice
• The aims of criminalization and public health: a compatibility problem?
• International comparative studies on disease and criminalization: policy, practice and legal issues

Publication
1. Up to eight articles will published in a special section in an issue of Sexually Transmitted Infections in 2013.
2. Two articles will be published in a special section in an issue of Journal of Medical Ethics in 2013.
All articles will be blind peer reviewed according to each individual journal’s editorial policies. Final publication decisions will rest with the Editors in Chief: Professor Jackie Cassell (STI) and Professor Julian Savulescu (JME).

Important Dates
Please submit your article to either journal no later than December 14th 2012.

Submission Instructions
For Sexually Transmitted Infections:
Articles for STI should be a maximum of 2,500 words and submitted via the journal’s website. Please choose the special issue ‘Criminalizing Contagion’ during the submission process.
For Journal of Medical Ethics:
Articles for JME should be a maximum of 3,500 words, and submitted via the journal’s website. Please choose the special issue ‘Criminalizing Contagion’ during the submission process.
Further submission instructions are on the journals’ respective websites. If you would like to discuss any aspect of your submission, including possible topics and the journals involved, please contact the guest editors in the first instance: Dr David Gurnham (David.Gurnham [at] manchester.ac.uk), Dr Catherine Stanton (Catherine.Stanton [at] manchester.ac.uk) or Dr Hannah Quirk (Hannah.Quirk [at] manchester.ac.uk).


Call for papers: biotechnology, health and intellectual property

25 August 2010

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law is accepting scholarly papers related to “Biotechnology and Health-Related Issues in IP Law” for their spring 2011 issue. Professionals and scholars are invited to submit a working paper or idea for consideration. Published individuals may also be invited to present their works at the RIPL symposium in April.

Proposals are due by September 10, 2010. For questions regarding submissions, contact: Wasim K. Bleibel – Lead Articles Editor, wbleibe@law.jmls.edu


Call for Papers: The Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

10 August 2010

The past few years have seen a resurgence of interest in the philosophy of medicine and health care.  Controversies about evidence, value, clinical knowledge, judgment, integrity and ethics have required practitioners and policy-makers confront the epistemic and moral basis of practice, while philosophers have found in these debates ways to invigorate and reframe the investigation of long-standing philosophical problems, about the nature of reasoning, science, knowledge and practice, and the relationships between epistemology and ethics, morals and politics.

The Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice is an international journal that focuses on the evaluation and development of clinical practice in medicine, nursing and the allied health professions.  It has a large and diverse readership including practitioners and academics from a vast range of areas, and a tradition of publishing papers raising epistemological, metaphysical and ethical issues underlying clinical policy and practice.  April 2010 saw the publication of the first thematic issue of the journal devoted entirely to philosophical issues.  We are seeking contributions to a second issue dedicated to philosophical issues in medicine, scheduled for publication in autumn 2011.  Papers are particularly welcome on the following themes:

1) the role of virtue in clinical practice (possible topics including: is health care a business or a profession?; virtue theory and an account of moral motivation in health care; virtue and financial incentives for performance; virtue-based practice: an option to improve pay for performance?; virtue theory and evidence based medicine; virtue theory and person-centred medicine; the virtuous practitioner, patient and health care relationship); and

2) the nature of progress in medicine (e.g. is medicine progressing?; what measures would we use to assess progress?; is progress always good?; how does research contribute to progress in medicine?).

However, we also welcome papers that do not fit neatly into one of these themes, but represent excellent examples of the application of philosophy to questions of substantive import in medicine and healthcare.

The deadline for submission of manuscripts is 1st March 2011.  Original papers are usually no more than 5000 words in length, and detailed author guidelines are available here. Those interested in submitting a paper are also encouraged to contact Michael Loughlin at m.loughlin@mmu.ac.uk .


Call for Papers: new issues in bioethics

5 August 2010

The Hastings Center Report Last Call for Papers
Deadline for submissions is August 15th

“Don’t miss a unique opportunity to voice your opinion on the future of bioethics and get published in the leading journal devoted to the ethical issues surrounding health, medicine, and the environment.

To mark the fortieth anniversary of the Hastings Center Report, we are looking forward. Rather than commemorate the issues and authors that the Report has published in the past, we want to know from you what issues bioethics should be looking at in the future!

Gregory E. Kaebnick, editor of the Hastings Center Report, is looking to the next generation for these answers. “We’ll throw the doors open: we’ll read anything that any student, graduate fellow, or untenured professor in bioethics sends us (current or former Center staff excluded), and we’ll publish the best of the lot in the November-December 2010 issue.”

Essays might call for new ways of doing bioethics or examine the implications of trends within the general categories that the Center now addresses-clinical care, public health, health policy, new technologies, and medical research. Essays might also identify underexamined topics within these categories.

Published since 1970, the Hastings Center Report is read by physicians, nurses, lawyers, research administrators, social workers, clergy, policy-makers, and scholars in a wide range of disciplines who are drawn to the mix of clinical case studies, research reports, and essays on issues in medicine, health care, public health, and the life sciences.

The essays should be 1,600 words and submitted to editorial@thehastingscenter.org by August 15, 2010.”


Call for papers: Hasting Center Report on new issues in bioethics

3 March 2010

The Hastings Center Report is marking its 40th anniversary by looking forward, in two ways.

Rather than commemorate the issues and authors that the Report has published in the past, wrote Gregory E. Kaebnick, editor of the Report, in the editor’s note for the January-February issue, “we’ll ask what issues bioethics should be looking at in coming years, and we’ll look to the next generation for answers.”

“We’ll throw the doors open: we’ll read anything that any student, graduate fellow, or untenured professor in bioethics send us (current or former Center staff excluded), and we’ll publish the best of the lot in the November-December issue.”

Essays might call for new ways of doing bioethics or examine the implications of trends within the general categories that the Center now addresses–clinical care, public health, health policy, new technologies, and medical research. Essays might also identify particular underexamined topics within the generally accepted categories. The ideal essay would be 1600 words long.

Essays can be sent to the editorial staff at editorial@thehastingscenter.org by August 15, 2010.