Conference: Mechanisms in medicine

20 April 2017

July 3-5 2017, Centre for Reasoning, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/jonw/mechanisms-in-medicine/

Keynote speakers
Raffaela Campaner (University of Bologna)
Daniel Commenges (Bordeaux Population Health Research Center)
Jeremy Howick (Oxford University)
Stathis Psillos (University of Athens)
Daniel Steel (The University of British Columbia)
Kurt Straif (International Agency for Research on Cancer)
John Worrall (London School of Economics)

Background
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a relatively recent technique for supporting clinical decisions by the current best evidence. While it is uncontroversial that we should use the current best evidence in clinical decision making, it is highly controversial as to what the best evidence is. EBM considers evidence from clinical trials, in particular, randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of those trials, to be the best evidence. On the other hand, evidence of mechanisms that is obtained by means other than clinical trials is considered to be of low quality.
However, there is a growing body of literature that highlights the many benefits of considering evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence from clinical trials. For instance, evidence of mechanisms is crucial for interpreting clinical trials, establishing a causal claim, and extrapolating from the trial population to the treatment population.
This conference seeks to explore whether and in which ways evidence of mechanism may improve medical decision making. The conference will bring together philosophers and medical researchers.

Registration
Registration is free but compulsory. There are a limited number of places so please register early. Please register via email to c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk

Organisation  
This conference is organised by Christian Wallmann on behalf of the Centre for Reasoning at the University of Kent and the EBM+ consortium. It is an activity of the project Evaluating evidence in medicine, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

For any queries please contact Christian Wallmann: c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk


Conference:Mechanisms in medicine

6 January 2017

July 3-5 2017, Centre for Reasoning, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/jonw/mechanisms-in-medicine/

Keynote speakers
Raffaela Campaner (University of Bologna)
Daniel Commenges (Bordeaux Population Health Research Center)
Jeremy Howick (Oxford University)
Stathis Psillos (University of Athens)
Daniel Steel (The University of British Columbia)
Kurt Straif (International Agency for Research on Cancer)
John Worrall (LSE)

Background
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a relatively recent technique for supporting clinical decisions by the current best evidence. While it is uncontroversial that we should use the current best evidence in clinical decision making, it is highly controversial what the best evidence is. EBM considers evidence from clinical trials, in particular, randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews of those trials to be the best evidence. On the other hand, evidence of mechanisms that is obtained by means other than clinical trials is considered to be of low quality.

However, there is a growing body of literature that highlights the many benefits of considering evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence from clinical trials. For instance, evidence of mechanisms is crucial for interpreting clinical trials, establishing a causal claim, and extrapolating from the trial population to the treatment population.
This conference seeks to explore whether and in which ways evidence of mechanism may improve medical decision making. The conference will bring together philosophers and medical researchers.

Call for papers
Please submit an abstract of up to 500 words on or before 1st February 2017 via email to c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk. The final decision on submissions will be made by 1st March.  A special session will be dedicated to contributions submitted by PhD candidates.

Contributions should address questions such as the following:
– How can we get evidence of mechanisms in medicine?
– How can evidence of mechanisms best be considered alongside evidence of correlation to evaluate causal claims in medical research and health policy?
– How can quality of evidence of mechanisms be characterised?
– Which accounts of causality best fit the programme for integrating evidence of mechanisms with evidence of correlation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms be employed in extrapolation?
– How can evidence of mechanisms inform statistical and graphical models in medicine?

Registration
Registration is free but compulsory. There are a limited number of places so please register early. Please register via email toc.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk

Organisation  
This conference is organised by Christian Wallmann on behalf of the Centre for Reasoning at the University of Kent and the EBM+ consortium. It is an activity of the project Evaluating evidence in medicine, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.
For any queries please contact Christian Wallmann: c.wallmann-520[at]kent.ac.uk


Seminars: The London Medico-Legal Society

17 November 2016

The London Medico-Legal Society meets monthly during the academic year for a lecture of interest followed by drinks and canapes. The meetings are held in the Medical Society of London building, a lovely old Georgian town house in Chandos Street W1.

We are keen to welcome new members, if you are interested in joining please do get in touch, you are very welcome to come to a couple of meetings before committing to join (the annual subscription is excellent value at £100 or £25 for students).

You will be very welcome; if you are planning to come to a meeting please contact us so that we can welcome you.

Dr Sarah Galbraith

Member of Council, London Medico-Legal Society

medicolegalgalbraith [at] gmail.com


Bedlam: the asylum and beyond

18 October 2016

15 September 2016 – 15 January 2017

Wellcome Collection, 183 Euston Rd, London NW1 2BE

Follow the rise and fall of the mental asylum and explore how it has shaped the complex landscape of mental health today. Reimagine the institution, informed by the experiences of the patients, doctors, artists and reformers who inhabited the asylum or created alternatives to it.

Today asylums have largely been consigned to history but mental illness is more prevalent than ever, as our culture teems with therapeutic possibilities: from prescription medications and clinical treatment to complementary medicines, online support, and spiritual and creative practices. Against this background, the exhibition interrogates the original ideal that the asylum represented – a place of refuge, sanctuary and care – and asks whether and how it could be reclaimed.

Taking Bethlem Royal Hospital as a starting point, ‘Bedlam: the asylum and beyond’ juxtaposes historical material and medical records with individual testimonies and works by artists such as David Beales, Richard Dadd, Dora García, Eva Kotátková, Madlove: A Designer Asylum, Shana Moulton, Erica Scourti, Javier Téllez and Adolf Wölfli, whose works reflect or reimagine the institution, as both a physical and a virtual space.

Visit the Wellcome Collection website for further information about the exhibition or to view the range of events associated with this exhibition including performance art, tours and discussions.

Art at Bethlem_ main [DavidBeales_OntheWard].jpg


Seminar: Who should we treat? Rare diseases, universal health coverage and children’s right to health

27 September 2016

10 October 2016, 16:00-17:30.

London Bioethics Colloquium – first speaker in the academic year

King’s College London, Strand Campus, Somerset House East Wing, SW1.17 (Ante Room)

Octavio Ferraz (Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London)

All are welcome, no need to register.

 

Diary dates for the academic year 2016-17
7 November 2016, 16:00-17:30
University College London, location TBC

Jochen Vollmann (Ruhr University Bochum): Personalised medicine: priority-setting and opportunity costs at an international scale
***

5 December 2016, 16:00-17:30
King’s College London, Strand Campus, Somerset House East Wing, SW1.18 (Moot Court)

Arnon Keren (University of Haifa / King’s College London): Autonomy, ignorance and informed consent

***

6 February 2017, 16:00-17:30
King’s College London, location TBC

Garrett Brown (University of Sheffield): An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure: Global health justice and the new global health emergency financing facilities’
***

6 March 2016, 16:00-17:30
University College London, location TBC

Emily McTernan (University College London): title TBC


Symposium: Self-Knowledge In and Out of Illness

28 April 2016

3rd May, 9:00-5:30, with a reception to follow, Greenwood Lecture Theatre, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London.

4th May, 9:00-5:00, Harris Lecture Theatre, Hodgkin Building, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London.

Knowledge of oneself — skin, breasts, blood sugar, oxygen saturation, genetic profile, heart rate, weight, state of mind — plays an increasing role in health care as patients are encouraged to take charge of their own health. Self-knowledge can be useful, worthless, or even detrimental. How do we get self-knowledge? How do we learn to use it and what are the obstacles? We may use self-knowledge to avoid or treat illness, but can illness also teach us about ourselves?

Further information here.

The event is free, no registration, and everyone is welcome.

Contact: philandmed@kcl.ac.uk


Film: The English Surgeon

28 February 2008

This film is being shown at free screenings at the Wellcome Trust – for details click here.

For a review, click here.

I am planning to go to the screening on Thursday 13 March at 8pm. If you would like to join me, please let me know by adding a comment so that I can reserve the right number of tickets.