Debate: FERTILITY TREATMENT ADD-ONS: DO THEY ADD UP?

10 March 2017

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 27 Sussex Place, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4RG

29 March 2017 6pm (wine reception), 6.30pm-8.30pm (panel discussion)

This Progress Educational Trust event, which is sponsored by the British Fertility Society, will begin with a wine reception at 6pm followed by a panel discussion at 6.30pm. To reserve your free place, email sstarr [at] progress.org.uk

The panel discussion will be chaired by FIONA FOX (Chair of Trustees at the Progress Educational Trust and Chief Executive of the Science Media Centre) with speakers PROFESSOR ADAM BALEN (Chair of the British Fertility Society), SALLY CHESHIRE (Chair of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority), DR SIMON FISHEL (Founder and President of CARE Fertility) and DR RAJ MATHUR (Lead for Reproductive Medicine at St Mary’s Hospital in Manchester).

Fertility treatment ‘add-ons’ are procedures and treatments offered alongside IVF – sometimes at considerable expense to the patient – which may not be supported by robust evidence. The benefits, harms and appropriateness of add-ons are often open to question, and the role of add-ons in fertility treatment has become a matter of heated debate among professionals and a source of confusion for patients.

Recently, add-ons have been discussed and debated in a controversial episode of the BBC1 programme Panorama entitled Inside Britain’s Fertility Business, in two studies published by in the British Medical Journal, in a study published by the journal Human Reproduction, and in work undertaken by the UK’s fertility regulator – the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Our event will ask:

• What counts as an add-on?

• Who is best placed to judge the evidence for add-ons, and what is the ideal standard of evidence?

• How much evidence is it reasonable to expect, before a treatment is offered to patients?

• What is the role of the HFEA, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and professional bodies such as the British Fertility Society, in helping patients navigate add-ons?

• What is the duty of the medical professional, and what is the role of patient choice?

Much of the event’s running time will be devoted to letting YOU put questions and comments to the speakers.


Conference: ‘A Right to Die?’ – Socio-legal perspectives at Keele University

6 March 2017

18th July 2017

School of Law, Keele University

Register here

Programme

10.00 Registration & Coffee

10.30 Welcome from Professor Alison Brammer, Head of Keele Law School

10:35 Introduction by Chair, Dr Sue Westwood

10.40 Keynote speaker: Professor Penney Lewis, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London (‘Assisted Dying and Legal Change’)

11.10 Q&A

11.20 – 12.30 Panel 1: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Current Debates. Chair: Dr Anthony Wrigley

Speaker (1) Dr Iain Brassington, University of Manchester (‘Overview of Debates’)

Speaker (2) Professor Richard Huxtable, University of Bristol (‘Euthanasia, Ethics and the Law’)

Speaker (3) Professor Alison Brammer, Keele University (‘Safeguarding Issues’)

12.20 Q&A

12.30 – 1.15 Lunch

1.15 – 2.40 Panel 2: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Views. Chair: Professor Marie-Andre Jacob

Speaker (1) Professor Clare Wilkinson, Bangor University (‘Why do we want the right to die?)

Speaker (2) Dr Glenys Caswell, University of Nottingham (‘Agency, death and dying in the UK’)

Speaker (3) Davina Hehir, Director of Legal Strategy and Policy, Dignity in Dying (‘Choice, control and access to services at the end of life: Advocating for the right to die’)

2.30 Q&A

2.40 – 3.00 Tea Break

3.00 – 4.10 Panel 3: Assisted Dying & Euthanasia – Subjectivities Chair: Dr Tsachi Keren-Perez

Speaker (1) Professor Celia Kitzinger, University of York (‘Court applications for withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration from patients in a permanent vegetative state: Family experiences’)

Speaker (2) Dr Sue Westwood, Keele University (‘Older lesbians, gay men and the “right to die” debate’)

Speaker (3) Professor Sue Read & Dr Sotirios Santatzoglou, Keele University (‘Exploring hospice care from the perspectives of people living with multiple sclerosis: An exploratory case study’)

4.00 Q&A

4.10 – 4.15 Closing comments (Chair)

4.15 Close


Conference: Patient safety, litigation against doctors and gross negligence manslaughter

1 March 2017

Friday 21 April 2017

Royal Society of Medicine
1 Wimpole Street
LONDON
W1G 0AE

Improving patient safety, by means of a reduction of medical errors, has been a major focus of attention over the past several years. This one-day meeting will review progress to date and consider how further progress can be made. Speakers include Professor Terence Stephenson, Chairman of the General Medical Council and Mr David Sellu, who went to prison on a charge of gross negligence manslaughter.

The ways and means of turning back the tide of litigation against doctors will be debated as well as the appropriateness of the use of criminal prosecution of surgeons for “gross negligence manslaughter”.

Further details including the agenda and how to register are available here.


Play: Bodies by Vivienne Franzmann

20 February 2017

 

“We should have brought a gift.”

“We’ve brought a gift. It’s called 22 thousand pounds.”

Purchased from Russia. Developed in India. Delivered to the UK.

A global transaction over nine months that offers ‘a lifetime of happiness’ to all involved.

“What do you think will happen to a baby girl in India that nobody wants?”

Vivienne Franzmann’s previous work at the Royal Court includes Pests and The Witness. Her new play Bodies will be directed by Jude Christian (Lela & Co.).

Wed 5 Jul – Sat 12 Aug

Jerwood Theatre Upstairs, Royal Court Theatre

Tickets from £12. General booking opens on Wed 22 Feb at 10am.


Event: Symposium on Law, Compassion, and Healthcare

20 February 2017

18 May 2017, 14:00—17:30hrs

Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London

A symposium exploring compassion in relation to law and healthcare – through presentations and discussion, with speakers from academia, practice, and the judiciary.

Speakers

Sir Mark Hedley, former High Court judge; ruled in, inter alia, Portsmouth NHS Trust v. Wyatt.

Professor Hazel Biggs, Professor of Healthcare Law and Bioethics; co-Director of HEAL (the Centre for Health Ethics and Law), University of Southampton, Editor-in-Chief (Joint), Medical Law Review

Paul Bowen QC, Brick Court Chambers; author of Blackstone’s Guide to the Mental Health Act 2007

Dr. Paquita de Zulueta, Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer, Imperial College; Member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Kate Rohde, Solicitor, Partner, Kingsley Napley

Dr. Phil Bielby, Law, University of Hull, author of Competence and Vulnerability in Biomedical Research

Dermot Feenan, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; Founder & Convenor, Law & Compassion Research Network

Chairs

Dr. Glenys Williams, Law, Aberystwyth University

Katy Peters, Law, University of Surrey

Registration fee £59.00 

Booking

Via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/symposium-on-law-compassion-and-healthcare-tickets-31853045316?aff=es2

Enquiries: Dermot Feenan, Academic Coordinator. dermot.feenan [at] sas.ac.uk

Organised by the Law & Compassion Research Network.


Seminar: religion, pluralism and medical ethics in paediatric intensive care

16 February 2017

May 8 2017, Jesus College Oxford 2pm-5pm, including refreshments

A child is critically ill in the intensive care unit. Doctors believe that the child’s prognosis is very poor and that treatment should be withdrawn. However, her parents do not agree. They say that it is contrary to their religion to stop treatment.

How often is religion a source of disagreement about treatment in intensive care? What are the views of major religions about withdrawing treatment in intensive care? 

Should religious requests for treatment be treated differently from secular requests? Should religious preferences for treatment count in a child? Should religious views be accommodated when providing scarce and expensive medical resources?

Guest Speaker: Prof John Paris S.J., Professor of Bioethics, Boston College

Speakers/ Panel Participants:

John Paris, Joe Brierley, Sarah Barclay, David Jones, John Wyatt, Siddiq Diwan, Dominic Wilkinson

This seminar is aimed at health professionals, ethicists, philosophers, theologians and chaplains. There are strictly limited places.

Early bird registration £15/10* if register by 28th February. £25/20* subsequently.

*Discounted registration for students.

To reserve a place at the seminar, please email rachel.gaminiratne [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk

Questions about the seminar should be directed to Professor Dominic Wilkinson, dominic.wilkinson [at] philosophy.ox.ac.uk


Study: Health Law and Ethics at Erasmus University Rotterdam

10 February 2017

The Erasmus Observatory on Health Law / Institute of Health Policy & Management (Erasmus University Rotterdam) announces the annual Summer school on Health Law and Ethics, providing students, academics, professionals and practitioners, with an opportunity for intensive training in various aspects of health law and ethics over a two-weeks period (you can sign up for 1 week or 2 weeks), while absorbing the sights, sounds and culture unique to Rotterdam and the Netherlands. The Summer school offers a custom-developed course taught by leading academics in their field.

The course is designed to enhance the preparation of health professionals confronted with legal and ethical issues. The course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of health law and ethics. A Certificate of Attendance will be presented to participants who wish to take the course for academic credit.