Job: Post-doctoral fellowship in transplantation

22 March 2017

Post-doctoral fellow 100%
Institute of Nursing Science, Department Public Health,
University of Basel, Switzerland
Spring 2017 (or as per agreement) –2021

The Institute of Nursing Science (INS) of the Department Public Health at the University of Basel invites applications for a position of a post-doctoral fellow to join the Building Research Initiative Group: Chronic Illness Management and Adherence in Transplantation (BRIGHT) Research Group and the Psychosocial Interest research Group (PSIG) of the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS). The BRIGHT study is an externally funded international research project studying behavioral and health system outcomes in solid organ transplantation. The STCS is funded through the Swiss National Science Foundation and is a national cohort study including a comprehensive dataset of biomedical, psychosocial, behavioral and genetic data from pre-transplant to up to 9 years post-transplant. The successful candidate will be part of the interdisciplinary international research group analyzing the data of these 2 studies as well as participate in the preparation and execution of planned intervention studies.

Your tasks
The successful candidate is expected to:
– Participate in the analysis and dissemination of the BRIGHT and STCS data.
– Develop your own research projects using existing BRIGHT & STCS data.
– Participate in the planning and execution of intervention studies.
– Acquire external research funding.
– Participate in teaching in the Master in Nursing Science and PhD Health Sciences curriculum.

Your profile
– PhD in Nursing Science, Public Health, Medicine, Health Economics or another field of the health sciences.
– Experience in the field of transplantation and behavioral/psychosocial science is desirable.
– Sound knowledge of basic office (e.g. Word, PowerPoint) programs.
– Sound methodological and statistical skills and knowledge of statistical analysis software such as R, SAS or SPSS.
– Proficiency of German or willingness to learn German in a short term.
– Excellent oral and written English skills.
– Outcome oriented, a good team player, able to meet deadlines and be stress resistant.

Our offer
The successful candidate will:
– benefit from being part of an international interdisciplinary research group and work closely with leading researchers in the field of transplantation.
– benefit from the well-established INS research infrastructure as well as from the infrastructure of the University of Basel.
– have the opportunity to develop own research projects and get support in view of statistical, behavioral science and intervention research methodologies.
– work in the heart of Basel.
– receive compensation in accordance with the University of Basel wage scales for post-doctoral students.

Further inquiries and application
More information on this application can be received from Professor Dr Sabina De Geest (PI BRIGHT study & chair PSIG of the STCS) sabina.degees [at] unibas.ch.
Please send your application in a single electronic document by March 31 2017 to bewerbung-nursing [at] unibas.ch. Your application must include a letter of interest (max. 700 words), curriculum vitae, a statement of research interests (max. 200 words) and details of three referees.

Advertisements

Conference: The British Transplantation Society Living Donor Forum and Winter Ethics Symposium 2016

11 November 2016

November 24 at 9:30 AM – November 25 at 5:00 PM

The BTS is delighted to announce the dates of two of the Society’s established annual meetings. Both events will take place at Mary Ward House, London on consecutive days so that delegates can choose to attend for one or both days, depending upon their areas of interest.

Winter Ethics Symposium 24 November

ORGAN DONATION AND TRANSPLANTATION RESEARCH DESIGN: PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES AND PATIENTS RIGHTS

“This year our focus is organ donation and transplantation research design. The symposium will draw on NHS Blood and Transplant’s published strategic research and development plan and the work of the National Institute for Health Research advisory group INVOLVE which was established in 1996 to support active public involvement in NHS, public health and social care research.

The programme brings together professional expertise and personal experience in the field of public involvement in research. It will provide insight into how organ donation and transplantation research is identified, prioritised, designed, conducted and disseminated and explore the ethical challenges facing everyone participating in research for patient benefit.”

09.30 Registration and Coffee

09.50 Welcome and Introduction

Session 1: RESEARCH, RETENTION and RIGHTS Chair: Antonia Cronin

10.00 An interview with David and Hazel Thewlis

10.40 Debate: This house believes there is not enough patient/public involvement in organ donation and transplantation research design

10.45 PRO Hugh Whittall

11.00 CON Brian Davidson

11.30 COFFEE

Session 2: KEY NOTE LECTURES Chair: Anne-Marie Slowther

12.00 Patient and Public Involvement in Research Design Simon Denegri

12.30 NHSBT Research and Development strategy Nick Watkins

13.00 LUNCH Session 3: ETHICAL ISSUES IN RESEARCH DESIGN Chair: Anya Adair

14.00 Case 1: Deceased donor abdominal transplantation research Peter Friend

14.30 Case 2: Deceased donor cardio-thoracic transplantation research Stephen Large

15.00 Case 2: Cell Therapy John Casey

15.30 Debate revisited

16.00 Close

There is a reduced rate of £35 for students.

Living Donor Forum 25 November

“This year’s living kidney donor forum theme is “Diversity and Complexity in Living Donor transplantation”. There will be interactive sessions to explore attitudes towards and experiences of the living kidney sharing schemes, highlighting complex scenarios to help shape future practice, and also multidisciplinary case-based discussions around donors who may be deemed higher risk, looking at current evidence to help inform decision making.

The living liver donor forum will address technical considerations for the donor and recipient, drawing on lessons learnt from the Eastern experience. This will be followed by the ever-popular interactive case discussions and finally we have guest speakers to discuss ethical dilemmas and to offer an Eastern solution to the lack of progress in living donor liver transplantation.

There will be active participation for delegates at both events with interactive sessions, keypad voting and debates.”


TV: My New Hand on BBC1

22 February 2013

Tuesday 26 February, 10.35-11.35pm, BBC ONE, and available after broadcast via the iPlayer

From the programme’s website: “On Boxing Day night 2012 surgeons at Leeds Infirmary carried out Britain’s first hand transplant.

This film, made over two years, follows the story from the moment Professor Simon Kay and his team decided to go ahead to the moment the patient was able to move the transplanted hand.

During that time candidates came forward from all over the UK and beyond, including a hairdresser, an IT consultant, a former pub landlord, a DJ and a retired housewife – all of whom had lost the use of at least one of their hands.

But before they could go ahead the doctors had to be sure they were physically and psychologically prepared.

Some decided that the risks – including the potentially life-shortening drugs that would need to be taken for the rest of their life – weren’t worthwhile. Others decided that the misery of living without a hand outweighed everything else.

This thought provoking film is with them as they make their decisions – and with the surgeons as the patient who comes through the process is finally taken into the operating theatre.”


Radio: Organ transplants

6 October 2011

BBC Radio 3, Monday 10th October 2011, 22.00-22.45

From the programme’s webpage: “As the Nuffield Council on Bioethics publishes a report on donating human bodily material for medicine and research, Anne McElvoy asks how far should society go in encouraging us to donate bodily material? Is it acceptable to offer people money? And what is the role of the government and others in responding to the demand for bodily material?”


TV: Transplant

3 October 2011

BBC1, Tuesday 4th October 2011, 22.35-23.35, available after broadcast via the iPlayer

From the programme’s website: “For the first time on UK television, Transplant shows the extraordinary reality of multiple organ donation, following the organs from a single donor to the different recipients. The film shows the surgeries and the human stories on both sides, as both donor and recipients have agreed to waive the normal anonymity that exists between them.

Transplant follows the complex process of donation coordinated by the organ donor organisation, NHS Blood and Transplant, from the very beginning when a potential donor is declared brain dead and their organs are retrieved through to the transplant surgeries and recovery of the patients who’ve benefited from the donor’s organs.”