Job: Clinical researcher in Bipolar Affective Disorder and advance directives

19 October 2016

Four-year position starting in January 2017, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London.

As part of a team (Dr Gareth Owen (psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience), Dr Tania Gergel (mental health ethics), Dr Larry Rifkin (psychiatry, South London & Maudsley), and Alex Ruck Keene (law) aiming to develop a tailored model of self-binding advance directives in Bipolar Affective Disorder within a real-life clinical service and to develop guidance for professional organisations, service-users and carers on advance directives, as well as recommendations for law reform, we are looking to recruit a Clinical Researcher.

This would be a four-year position starting in January 2017 (although there could be some degree of flexibility on timing). We are looking for someone who has completed (or is shortly due to complete) membership of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and is interested in combining academic research with clinical training.

Service user involvement will be integral to the project throughout and there will also be an important Medical Humanities element, focusing on personhood and decision-making in Bipolar.   There will be the opportunity to complete a PhD as part of their work on this project and to develop specialist expertise on Bipolar.

This team is one work stream within Mental Health and Justice, a major collaborative and interdisciplinary five-year research project, funded by the Wellcome Trust.  Informed by the debate surrounding the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (UNCRPD), the project will explore multiple aspects of the questions surrounding the nature of decision-making ability within mental disorder and how decision-making can be supported when compromised by illness.

Alongside the academic research, one day each week will be spent working in clinical practice to maintain a clinical training pathway. The candidate will be supported with a Health Education England OOPR application to count toward CCT.

If you think that you might be interested and would like to know more about the position, please contact Dr Gareth Owen (gareth.1.owen@kcl.ac.uk; tel 0207 8485479) for further information.  Please look out for the forthcoming advertisement on the King’s College London vacancy page.


Call for Abstracts – PGBC 2013: Bioethics in Law and Public Policy

31 January 2013

Image7th Annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference

22-24 May 2013, King’s College London

The convenors of the 7th annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference invite doctoral students working in any area of bioethics to submit abstracts for this year’s conference, which will take place on 22-24 May 2013 at King’s College London. In accordance with the theme of this year’s conference, we would particularly welcome papers that explore the law and/or policy dimensions of bioethics scholarship. We hope that the papers presented at PGBC 2013 will relate not only to the ethical implications of a particular issue, but also to the additional problems raised by the responses to ethical issues fashioned by laws and policies.

Please submit your abstracts to postgrad.bioethics [at] outlook.com. Abstracts should be in English, no more than 300 words, and in Word or preferably PDF format. Please note that you must be a registered PhD student, and we will only accept abstracts sent from a valid institutional email address.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 31 March 2013. Successful applicants will be notified by email by 10 April 2013. There will be an opportunity for unsuccessful applicants and those not wishing to give a paper to register as attendees (for free!) in April.

More information on PGBC 2013 is available at postgradbioethics.org. We are also on twitter (twitter.com/pgbc2013) and facebook (facebook.com/postgradbioethics). Please contact us via social media or email (postgrad.bioethics [at] outlook.com) with any questions.

PGBC 2013 gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Society of Applied Philosophy, and the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London.